Tyne

From Naval History Archive
Jump to navigationJump to search
HM, Naval Base, Tyne
HMS Calliope
Ensign of the Royal Navy animated.gif
CountryUnited Kingdom
AllegianceBritish Empire
BranchRoyal Navy
TypeStation
Part ofCoast of Scotland Station (1914-1939)
Rosyth Command (1939-1945)
Garrison/HQTyne, England.
Commanders
FirstCaptain Frederick K. C. Gibbons
LastRear-Admiral Sir Wellwood George Courtenay Maxwell

Tyne was a naval base and area command of the Royal Navy as one of the geographical divisions into which the Royal Navy divided its worldwide responsibilities. It was centered on the Port City of Newcastle in North East England from 1914 to 1920, and again from 1939 to 1945.

History

Tyne was first established as a naval command of the Royal Navy during World War I in March, 1915 as part of the Coast of Scotland Station,[1] and remained active until 18 January, 1920.[2] The command was reactivated just before the start of World War II in August 1939 as part of the Rosyth Command and remained active until July, 1945.[3]

In Command

Included:[4]

Senior Naval Officer, Tyne (1915-1920)

  1. Captain Frederick K. C. Gibbons, March, 1915 – 20 March, 1916
  2. Captain Edward G. Lowther-Crofton, 20 March, 1916 – 13 March, 1918
  3. Captain William Bowden-Smith, March, 1918 – 1 June, 1919
  4. Commander George M. Skinner, 13 September, 1919 – 18 January, 1920

Flag Officer-in-Charge, Newcastle (1939-1945)

  1. Rear-Admiral Sir Wellwood George Courtenay Maxwell,(retd), 26 August, 1939 – July, 1945.[5]

Chief Staff Officer to Flag Officer-in-Charge, Newcastle

  1. Captain E.H. Dauglish, (retd), 26 June, 1942 – July, 1945.[6]

Secretary to Flag Officer-in-Charge, Newcastle

  1. Paymaster Commander S. Finnis, (retd), 24 August, 1939 – August, 1942.[7]
  2. Paymaster .Lt.Cdr. B.R.W. Gofton, RNVR, August, 1942 – July, 1945.[8]

Components of this Command

At various times it may have encompassed naval formations and other ships not attached to other fleets. In addition to shore establishments including, barracks, dockyards, depots, hospitals, refitting and re-supply bases, naval bases or victualling yards. Those components that were part of this station are shown below.[9]

Naval Forces

Unit From To Ref
9th Destroyer Flotilla August, 1914 1917 [10]
8th Minesweeping Flotilla September, 1939 1942 [11]
16th Minesweeping Flotilla August, 1942 September, 1943 [12]
10th Sloop Flotilla January, 1917 January, 1918 [13]
2nd Submarine Flotilla January, 1917 January, 1918 [14]
3rd Submarine Flotilla August, 1916 March, 1917 [15]
6th Submarine Flotilla January, 1915 January, 1918 [16]
10th Submarine Flotilla August, 1914 August, 1916 [17]

References

  1. Watson, Dr Graham (27 October 2015). "Royal Navy Organisation and Ship Deployment, World War I, 1914-1918, Scottish Coast Command". www.naval-history.net. Gordon Smith. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  2. Harley, Simon; Lovell, Tony (4 January 2019). "Tyne - The Dreadnought Project". www.dreadnoughtproject.org. Harley and Lovell. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  3. Houterman, Hans; Koppes, Jeroen. "Royal Navy, Rosyth Command 1939-1945". www.unithistories.com. Netherlands: Houterman and Koppes. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  4. Harley and Lovell.
  5. Houterman and Koppes
  6. Houterman and Koppes
  7. Houterman and Koppes
  8. Houterman and Koppes
  9. Watson, Dr Graham (19 September 2015). "Royal Navy Organisation in World War 2, 1939-1945: Rosyth Command". www.naval-history.net. Gordon Smith. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  10. Watson (October 2015). Scottish Coast Command.
  11. Watson (2015). Rosyth Command.
  12. Watson (2015). Rosyth Command.
  13. Smith, Gordon (5 January 2015). "World War 1 Dispositions of Royal Navy ships". www.naval-history.net. G. Smith. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  14. Smith (January 2015).
  15. Watson (October 2015). Scottish Coast Command.
  16. Smith (January 2015).
  17. Watson (October 2015). Scottish Coast Command.