Station

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Map of Major Stations of the Royal Navy in 1940 courtesy of Gordon Smith at https://www.naval-history.net/ showing the boundaries of the various naval area commands.

A Station was a geographical naval command area or area of responsibility usually under a Commander-in-Chief who was in sole charge for the conduct of operations within their designated area. It would encompass seagoing commands including formations such as divisions, forces, squadrons, flotillas, and individual ships under its command,[1] The station would also include a combination of logistical support commands and shore commands such as a naval dockyard or naval base or naval air station.

Description

The British Royal Navy was deployed around the world, divided into various fleets operating from a number of major regional stations, also known as commands. For command purposes each normally under an admiral these major stations were then further divided in subordinate commands also defined by the Department of Admiralty as stations. Within each station there would be operational sea commands such as a Service, Squadrons, Division, Force or Flotilla supporting these would be supported by Naval Bases that usually encompassed a Naval Barracks, Naval Dockyards, Naval Hospitals, Victualling Yard and so forth.

See Also

References

  1. Watson, Dr Graham. "Royal Navy Organisation and Ship Deployment, Inter-War Years: 1914-1918: INTRODUCTION". www.naval-history.net. Gordon Smith, 27 October 2015. Retrieved 21 March 2018.

Bibliography

  1. Archives, The National. "Records of Stations and Fleets: Division within ADM". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. London, England: The National Archives.
  2. Strauss, Michael J. (2009). The leasing of Guantanamo Bay. Westport, Conn.: Praeger Security International. ISBN 9780313377839.
  3. Watson, Dr Graham. "Royal Navy Organisation and Ship Deployment, Inter-War Years: 1914-1918: INTRODUCTION". www.naval-history.net.