Secretary for Military Correspondence

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United Kingdom
Office of the Secretary for Military Correspondence
Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom from 1837 to 1952.png
Royal Arms as used by His Majesty's Government
War Office
StyleThe Right Honourable
(Formal prefix)
Secretary for Military Correspondence
SeatWestminster, London
AppointerThe British Monarch
on advice of the Prime Minister
Term lengthNo fixed term
Formation1857-1861

The Secretary for Military Correspondence, was a senior War Office position first established from 1857 who was responsible for military and professional matters, including military appointments, promotions, honours, the strength and distribution of the forces. In 1861 his office was abolished and replaced by a Military Permanent Under Secretary of State for War.[1]

History

In 1857 the offices of Clerk of the Ordnance and Military Under Secretary of State for War were abolished, the Deputy Secretary-at-War became Permanent Under Secretary of State, a new post of Assistant Under Secretary of State was created and a military officer was appointed Secretary for Military Correspondence. This last officer was responsible for military and professional matters, including military appointments, promotions, honours, the strength and distribution of the forces (which involved correspondence with the Commander-in-Chief and his staff), for artillery matters and for pensioners.[2] The Assistant Under Secretary was responsible for financial affairs, the Militia, stores, clothing and contracts; the Permanent Under Secretary was responsible for political and miscellaneous matters, office management and all other functions not specifically allocated to the other two officers."

In 1861 the office of Assistant Under Secretary lapsed and a second Military Permanent Under Secretary of State for War was created to join the (civilian) Permanent Under Secretary of State for War, replacing the Secretary for Military Correspondence.[3] In 1862 the civilian under secretaryship was abolished and the previous office of Assistant Under Secretary was revived.[4]

Office Holders

Rank Name Terrm
Colonel Sir Henry K. Stokes [5][6][7] 1857–1861

Footnotes

  1. Roper, Dr Michael (1998). The records of the War Office and related departments, 1660-1964. London: Public Record Office. pp. 97–98. ISBN 1873162456.
  2. Roper, pp.97-98.
  3. Roper, pp.97-98.
  4. Roper, Dr Michael (1998). The records of the War Office and related departments, 1660-1964. London: Public Record Office. pp. 195–196. ISBN 1873162456.
  5. Harts Army List: New Annual Army List and Militia List. London: John Murray. 1858. p. 480.
  6. Harts Army List, 1859. p.462.
  7. Harts Army List, 1861. p.474.

Bibliography

  1. Harts Army List: (1858). New Annual Army List and Militia List. London: John Murray.
  2. Harts Army List: (1859).New Annual Army List and Militia List. London: John Murray.
  3. Harts Army List: (1861).New Annual Army List and Militia List. London: John Murray.
  4. Roper, Dr Michael (1998). The records of the War Office and related departments, 1660-1964. London: Public Record Office. ISBN 1873162456.