Rangoon

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Rangoon
HMS Chinthe
Ensign of the Royal Navy animated.gif
Active
CountryFlag of British Burma 1939 to 1941 and 1945 to 1948.png British Burma
AllegianceFlag United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.gif United Kingdom
BranchNaval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
TypeNaval Base & Station
Garrison/HQRN Base, Rangoon, Burma

Rangoon was a naval base and area command of the Royal Navy. Rangoon is located on the central coastline on the banks of the Rangoon River, it is 40 kilometers upriver from the Gulf of Martaban off the Andaman Sea.

History

Founded as Dagon in the 6th Century by the Mon, the ancient Port of Dagonn was a small fishing village. In 1755, King Alaungpaya conquered the town and renamed it, bringing more settlers to the Port of Yangon.

During the First Anglo-Burmese War from 1824 to 1926, the British took the Port of Yangon but returned it to Burma after the war. In 1841, a fire destroyed the Port of Yangon. In the Second Anglo-Burmese War of 1852, the British again took the Port of Yangon and all of southern Burma. Under the British Empire, the Port of Rangoon was transformed into a political and commercial center. They built a new city there on delta land, and the Port of Rangoon was made the capital of British Burma when they conquered Upper Burma in the Third Anglo-Burmese War of 1885. In 1880, the Commissioners for the Port of Rangoon were formed.

By the late 19th Century, the Port of Yangon had a fast-growing population, increasing commerce, and greater prosperity. The British created hospitals and colleges in the city. As a British colony, the Port of Yangon had many big parks, lakes, and a blend of modern and traditional architecture. For a time, it was called the “garden city of the East.” At the beginning of the 20th Century, the Port of Rangoon’s city infrastructure and services rivaled that of London.

When World War I ended, the Port of Rangoon became the nucleus of the country’s movement for independence. Three nationwide strikes began there against the British (1920, 1936, and 1938). During World War II, Japan occupied the Port of Rangoon, and the city suffered heavy damage. After World War II, the Port of Rangoon became independent Burma’s capital in 1948, when many street and park names were changed to more traditional Burmese names. In 1989, the government changed the English name of Rangoon to Yangon.

In Command

Map of RN Bases and Ports Indian Ocean in World War Two. © Gordon Smith https://www.naval-history.net

Naval Officer-in-Charge, Rangoon (1939-1942)

  1. Captain Kenneth Sidebottom Lyle, BRNVR, 3 September, 1939 2 September, 1941.[1]
  2. Captain John Ignatius Hallett, (retd), 2 September, 1941 - January, 1942.[2]

Commodore Commanding, Burma Coast (1942)

  1. Rear-Admiral, Cosmo Moray Graham, (retd), January, 1942 – 6 August, 1942.[3][4]

Naval Officer-in-Charge, Rangoon (1942-1943)

  1. Captain John Ignatius Hallett, (retd), 8 April, 1942 – June, 1943. (also N.O.I.C, Chittagong).[5]

References

  1. Houterman, Hans; Koppes, Jeroen. "Burma Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (BRNVR) Officers 1939-1945". www.unithistories.com. Netherlands: Houterman and Koppes. Retrieved 24 September 2020.
  2. Grehan, John; Mace, Martin (2014). "1: Air Operations in Burma and Bay of Bengal Spring 1942". Far East Air Operations, 1942–1945. Barnsley: Pen and Sword. ISBN 978-1-4738-4121-5.
  3. Houterman, Hans; Koppes, Jeroen. "Royal Navy (RN) Officers 1939-1945  --  G". www.unithistories.com. Netherlands: Houterman and Koppes. Retrieved 24 September 2020.
  4. Grehan Chapter 1.
  5. Houterman, Hans; Koppes, Jeroen. "Royal Navy (RN) Officers 1939-1945  --  H". www.unithistories.com. Netherlands: Houterman and Koppes. Retrieved 24 September 2020.