Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Defence for the Royal Navy

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United Kingdom
Office of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Defence for the Royal Navy
Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom from 1837 to 1952.png
Seal of HM Government
Navy Department
StyleThe Right Honourable
(Formal prefix)
Minister of Defence for the Royal Navy
Member ofAdmiralty Board
Navy Board
SeatWestminster, London
AppointerThe British Monarch
on advice of the Prime Minister
Term lengthNo fixed term
Formation1964-1981
First holderThe Rt. Hon. Joseph Mallalieu
Final holderThe Rt. Hon. Keith Speed

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Defence for the Royal Navy also known as the Minister of State for the Royal Navy was a senior ministerial appointment of the British Government established in October 1964 as a junior Minister under the Minister of State for the Royal Navy until 6 January 1967, when that office was abolished and this office holder became responsible for the administration of the Royal Navy. The office holder was the political head of the Navy Department of the Ministry of Defence, and reported to the Secretary of State for Defence.

History

On 25 April 1964, the functions of the Department of Admiralty were absorbed into an enlarged Ministry of Defence where it was renamed the Navy Department. The office of the First Lord of the Admiralty, the cabinet minister responsible for the admiralty was abolished and replaced by a Minister of State for the Royal Navy. On 6 January 1967 this post of Minister of State for the Royal Navy was abolished and replaced by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Defence for the Royal Navy.[1]. On 29 May 1981 this office was abolished along with the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Defence for the Army and the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Defence for the Royal Air Force and replaced by a new unified political office covering all of the British Armed Forces called the Minister of State for the Armed Forces.

Office Holders

  1. The Rt. Hon. Joseph Mallalieu, 21 October 1964 – 6 April 1966.[2]
  2. The Rt. Hon. Lord Winterbottom, 6 April 1966 – 7 January 1967.[3]
  3. The Rt. Hon. Maurice Foley, 7 January 1967 – 3 July 1968.[4]
  4. The Rt. Hon. David Owen, 3 July 1968 – 24 June 1970.[5]
  5. The Rt. Hon. Peter Kirk, 24 June 1970 – 5 November 1972.[6]
  6. The Rt. Hon. Antony Buck, 5 November 1972 – 8 March 1974.[7]
  7. The Rt. Hon. Frank Judd, 8 March 1974 – 14 April 1976.[8]
  8. The Rt. Hon. Patrick Duffy, 14 April 1976 – 4 May 1979.[9]
  9. The Rt. Hon. Keith Speed, 6 May 1979 – 18 May 1981.[10] (Office abolished 29 May 1981)

References

  1. Steinberg, S. (2016). The Statesman's Year-Book 1967-68: The One-Volume ENCYCLOPAEDIA of all nations. London: Macmillan St Martins Press. p. 103. ISBN 9780230270961.
  2. Hampshire, Edward (2016). From East of Suez to the Eastern Atlantic: British Naval Policy 1964-70. Cambridge: Routledge. p. 97. ISBN 978-1-317-13234-9.
  3. Government, HM (1965). "Information Division". BIS. Washington: British Information Services (729): 4.
  4. "Maurice Foley". The Independent Newspaper. London. 14 February 2002. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  5. Mackby, Jenifer; Cornish, Paul (2008). U.S.-UK Nuclear Cooperation After 50 Years. Washington, D.C., United States.: CSIS. p. 279. ISBN 978-0-89206-530-1.
  6. The British Imperial Calendar and Civil Service List ... Or: General Register of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Its Colonies. London: Warrington & Company. 1972. p. 121.
  7. Roth, Andrew (11 October 2003). "Obituary: Sir Antony Buck". The Guardian Newspaper. London. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  8. Information, Reed Business (11 September 1975). "Hydrography needs new paymasters". New Scientist. London: Reed Business Information. 67 (966): 594. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  9. Government, HM. "Parliamentary career for Sir Patrick Duffy - MPs and Lords - UK Parliament". members.parliament.uk. UK Parliament. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  10. Government, HM. "Parliamentary career for Sir Keith Speed - MPs and Lords - UK Parliament". members.parliament.uk. London: UK Parliament. Retrieved 22 March 2020.