Narrow Seas Squadron

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Narrow Seas Squadron
Navy Royal Blue Ensign 1630 to 1707.gif
Ensign of the last Admiral of the Narrow Seas
Active1412–1688
CountryFlag Kingdom of England.gif Kingdom of England
BranchNavy Royal Ensign to 1625a.gif Navy Royal
TypeSquadron
RoleCruising, and Patrolling
Part ofNavy Royal Royal Navy
Garrison/HQDeal Dockyard, Kent, England.
Commanders
FirstVice-Admiral: Sir John Pendagrast.
LastAdmiral of the Blue: Sir Roger Strickland.

The Narrow Seas Squadron [1] also referred to as the Eastern Squadron [2] (1412-1688) was a series of temporary naval formations first formed in under the Navy Royal during the fifteenth century, then later the Commonwealth Navy in the mid-17th century and again at the start of the 18th century as part of the Royal Navy.

The squadron was usually commanded by the Admiral of the Narrow Seas.

History

The English Navy has organized its fleet into subcommands namely squadrons from at least 1205.[3]. The Narrow Seas Squadron was first formed in 1412 under the command of Vice-Admiral Sir John Pendagrast. From 1509 until 1603 Vice-Admirals commanding particular fleets were styled so as to denote he was junior to the Lord Admiral of England these flag officers were formally appointed by the crown.[4] By 1560 The Navy Royal had four functioning squadrons one in the Channel (Western), and the Irish Sea, Narrow Seas (Eastern) and another in the North Sea.[5]. The squadron existed until 1688 when it was disbanded.

In Command

Among the most important naval commands during these times was the Admiral of the Narrow Seas sometimes called the Vice-Admiral of the Narrow Seas or Rear-Admiral of the Narrow Seas to denote he was junior to the Lord Admiral of England, these flag officers were formally appointed by the crown.

Admiral of the Narrow Seas

Vice-Admiral of the Narrow Seas

Rear-Admiral of the Narrow Seas

Footnotes

  1. Winfield, Rif (2010). "Appendices: Appendix 1: English Naval vessels engaged in the action against the Armada 1588". British Warships in the Age of Sail 1603-1714: Design, Construction, Careers and Fates. Barnsley, England: Seaforth Publishing. p. 285. ISBN 9781783469246.
  2. Childs, David (2014). Pirate Nation: Elizabeth I and her Royal Sea Rovers. Barnsley, England: Seaforth Publishing. p. 141. ISBN 9781848322943.
  3. Rose, Susan (2013). "3:The Navy of England understanding the resources of the crown". England's Medieval Navy 1066-1509: Ships, Men & Warfare. Barnsley, England: Seaforth Publishing. ISBN 9781473853546.
  4. Rodger, N.A.M. (1997). "Social History of Officers 1509-1603". The safeguard of the sea : a naval history of Britain. Vol 1., 660–1649. London, England: Penguin. p. 298. ISBN 9780140297249.
  5. Corbett, Julian Stafford (1917). "The Navy of Elizabeth". Drake and the Tudor navy, with a history of the rise of England as a maritime power. London, England: London : Longmans, Green. p. 347.

Bibliography

  1. Corbett, Julian Stafford (1917). "The Navy of Elizabeth". Drake and the Tudor navy, with a history of the rise of England as a maritime power. London, England: London : Longmans, Green.
  2. Rose, Susan (2013). "3:The Navy of England understanding the resources of the crown". England's Medieval Navy 1066-1509: Ships, Men & Warfare. Barnsley, England: Seaforth Publishing. ISBN 9781473853546.
  3. Rodger, N.A.M. (1997). "Social History of Officers 1509-1603". The safeguard of the sea : a naval history of Britain. Vol 1., 660–1649. London, England: Penguin. ISBN 9780140297249.