Military Permanent Under Secretary of State for War

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United Kingdom
Office of the Military Permanent Under Secretary of State for War
Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom from 1837 to 1952.png
Royal Arms as used by His Majesty's Government
War Office
StyleThe Right Honourable
(Formal prefix)
Military Under Secretary of State for War
Member ofBritish Cabinet
Army Council
SeatWestminster, London
AppointerThe British Monarch
on advice of the Prime Minister
Term lengthNo fixed term
Formation1861-1862

The Military Permanent Under Secretary of State for War, was a senior War Office position first established in 1861 when it replaced the office of the Secretary for Military Correspondence. In 1862 this office was abolished and his former duties were divided between the remaining under secretaries. He reported to the Secretary of State for War.[1]

History

On the establishment of the separate Department of the Secretary of State for War in 1854 a Military Under Secretary of State for War was appointed to share with the Parliamentary Under Secretary for War the administration of the Department. They were joined in 1855 by the Deputy Secretary at War on the merger with the War Office. In 1857 the Military Under Secretary for War along with the Deputy Secretary at War were replaced by a civilian Permanent Under Secretary of State for War and an Assistant Under Secretary for War. The Permanent Under Secretary and his subordinate secretaries superintended of various offices and departments. In 1861 the office of Assistant Under Secretary lapsed and a second Military Permanent Under Secretary of State for War was appointed to replace the Secretary for Military Correspondence,[2] and join the (civilian) Permanent Under Secretary of State for War. In 1862 the civilian under secretaryship was abolished and the previous office of Assistant Under Secretary was revived.[3]

In 1868 a Comptroller-in-Chief of the Army, with the rank of a second Permanent Under Secretary, was appointed to take charge of the Stores, Clothing, Contracts, Commissariat, Purveyor's and Barrack Departments. The First Clerk’s Branch established in the new War Office in 1855 was divided in 1857 into a Chief Clerk’s Branch and an Assistant Chief Clerk’s Branch; a further subdivision in 1858 created a Militia Branch out of the former. In 1861 the Assistant Chief Clerk’s Branch was abolished, its functions being divided between the Chief Clerk’s Branch and the Military Assistant’s Branch. The Chief Clerk’s Branch was now responsible for War Office establishment, military education, submissions to the Queen, printing, army forms, stationery, library and educational supplies and the Registry (R). In 1866 the Chief Clerk’s Branch, the Military Assistant’s Branch and the Library were merged to form the Central Department under the Permanent Under Secretary.[4]

In the reorganisation of 1870 the office of Assistant Under Secretary of State for War was once again abolished and the his Accounts Department passed to the Financial Secretary. The Permanent Under Secretary became once more a civilian and his responsibilities were confined to the Central Department, which he superintended jointly with the Parliamentary Under Secretary. The Central Department, which was composed of the Chief Clerk’s Division and the Solicitor’s (later Legal Secretary's) Division, lost some of its former functions to the Military and Finance Departments. In 1887 the Central Department changed its name to Central Office, but remained unchanged. In 1904 the Central Office was renamed the Department of the Secretary until 1924 when it was altered again to the Department of the Permanent Under Secretary of State for War, 1924-1964.[5]

Office Holders

Rank Name Terrm
Major General Sir Edward Lugard [6] 1861–1862

Departments under this Office

Included:[7]

(1861-1862)
  • Commissariat Department
  • Stores Department
  • Clothing Department
  • Purveyor’s Department
  • Ordnance Department
  • Army Medical Department

Footnotes

  1. Roper, Dr Michael (1998). The records of the War Office and related departments, 1660-1964. London: Public Record Office. pp. 97–100. ISBN 1873162456.
  2. Roper, Dr Michael (1998). The records of the War Office and related departments, 1660-1964. London: Public Record Office. pp. 97–98. ISBN 1873162456.
  3. Roper, Dr Michael (1998). The records of the War Office and related departments, 1660-1964. London: Public Record Office. pp. 195–196. ISBN 1873162456.
  4. Roper, pp.195-196.
  5. Roper, pp.195-196.
  6. Harts Army List: New Annual Army List and Militia List. London: John Murray. 1861. p. 474.
  7. Roper, pp.97-100.

Bibliography

  1. Harts Army List: (1861). New Annual Army List and Militia List. London: John Murray.
  2. Roper, Dr Michael (1998). The records of the War Office and related departments, 1660-1964. London: Public Record Office. ISBN 1873162456.