Louisbourg Naval Shipyard

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HM Naval Yard, Louisbourg
White Ensign of Great Britain (1707–1800).svg
Part of North America Station
Louisbourg, Nova Scotia in Canada
Site information
OperatorRoyal Navy
Controlled byNavy Board
Site history
In use1745-1768
Installation information
Past
commanders
Resident Commissioner at Louisbourg
OccupantsNorth America Squadron

Louisbourg Naval Shipyard was a British Royal Navy dockyard located at Louisbourg, Nova Scotia, Canada. It was active from 1745 to 1768. Louisbourg and the naval yard was the first base and headquarters of the North America Station and served the ships of the North America Squadron until the main base and dockyard was moved to Halifax Nova Scotia.

History

The harbour had been used by European mariners since at least the 1590s, when it was known as English Port. The British captured Louisbourg from the French in June 1745 and built a careening yard at that location. Over the following twelve months the Navy Board in London sent out equipment needed for its expansion. By June 1746 a yard had been equipped and was capable of heaving down ships of up to 60 guns for repairs and cleaning.[1]

In 1749 the naval establishment was briefly returned to France following the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle. However the Admiralty started to recognize the importance of having a naval base in this part of Canada, it then ordered the Navy Board to research a suitable location and facilities needed for ships on the Halifax Station.[2]

Louisbourg Naval Shipyard continued to be used until the start of the Seven Years War in 1756 the need to re-establish a base to continually defend Newfoundland and and Nova Scotia and capture Canada was urgently needed. In 1758 the chosen location of the first permanent naval base in Canada was to be at Halifax, Nova Scotia. The yard was gradually run down until the British abandoned it altogether in 1768.[3] At which point Halifax Dockyard became the main naval base in North America until the early 1818 when it was superseded by Bermuda Dockyard.

Administration of the Naval Yard

Officers of the Yard

Master Carpenter at Louisbourg

1758, Nathaniel Knapp. (also officer for the Care of Sick and Wounded).[4]

Footnotes

  1. Day, John Frederick (April 2012). "British Admiralty Control and Naval Power in the Indian Ocean (1793-1815) (Volume 1 of 2)" (PDF). core.ac.uk. Exeter: University of Exeter. pp. 54–55. Retrieved 3 August 2019. Submitted for a thesis for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Maritime History
  2. Day. pp.54-55.
  3. Day. pp.54-55.
  4. Marble, Allan Everett (1993). Surgeons, Smallpox, and the Poor: A History of Medicine and Social Conditions in Nova Scotia, 1749-1799. Montreal: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP. pp. 59, 65, 344. ISBN 9780773509887.

Bibliography

  1. Day, John Frederick (April 2012). "British Admiralty Control and Naval Power in the Indian Ocean (1793-1815) (Volume 1 of 2)" (PDF). core.ac.uk. Exeter: University of Exeter. pp. 54–55. Retrieved 3 August 2019. Submitted for a thesis for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Maritime History
  2. Marble, Allan Everett (1993). Surgeons, Smallpox, and the Poor: A History of Medicine and Social Conditions in Nova Scotia, 1749-1799. Montreal: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP. pp. 59, 65, 344. ISBN 9780773509887.