Lisbon Dockyard

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HM Dockyard, Lisbon
Ensign of the Royal Navy animated.gif
Part of Lisbon Station
(1779–1809)
Portugal Station
(1810-1815)
Lisbon in Portugal
TypeNaval Base
Naval Dockyard
Site information
OperatorRoyal Navy
Controlled byNavy Board
Site history
In use1704-1725
1795-1799
1808-1815
Installation information
Past
commanders
Resident Commissioner Lisbon

Lisbon Dockyard or formally H.M. Dockyard, Lisbon was a Royal Naval Dockyard located at Lisbon, Portugal on the Atlantic coast. It served as the primary shore establishment for both the Lisbon Station, the Portugal Station and their component squadrons. It was in operation from 1704 to 1725, 1795 to 1799 and finally from 1808 to 1814.[1]

The dockyard was managed and controlled by the Navy Board through its resident commissioner.

History

The Methuen Treaty continued a long association between the British navy and the use of Lisbon and the Tagus. Blake had used Lisbon in 1650 to 1652 and again from 1656-1657 to refit his ships and naval stores were moved there when England abandoned Tangier. The British navy’s formal involvement with Lisbon can be seen in its establishment of a naval base at that port from 1704 to 1738, 1795 to 1799 and finally from 1808 to 1814 as recorded in the National Archive. This shows a formal dockyard was in place in these years but the port was also used at other times during the eighteenth century.[2]

Although Gibraltar was taken in 1704 it was unable to provide logistic support so Lisbon was used for repair and refit of Queen Anne’s squadrons. The facilities and personnel appear to have been inadequate as Vice-Admiral Byng wrote to the Admiralty in September 1706 that if a squadron was to remain for the winter at Lisbon another hulk was needed together with technical dockyard officers.69 The Navy Board’s reply to the Admiralty stated they did not know what staff, facilities and stores to send to Lisbon, as they did not know the number or type of ships in admiral Byng’s fleet.[3]

Lisbon was used by Britain’s navy in war and peace throughout the eighteenth century, but at times Portugal was under pressure from Spain and France to withhold assistance making access to Gibraltar and Minorca essential.[4]

Administration of the Dockyard

Before 1832 dockyards were run entirely by naval officers who were civilian employees of the Navy Board, not sea officers. The senior official of each dockyard was the commissioner, who was supported by principal officers.[5]

Senior Officers of the Yard

Resident Commissioner Lisbon

Principal Officers of the Yard

Master Attendant at Lisbon

  • 1716, David Bartlett.[6]

Clerk of the Cheque

Source

  • 1716-1719, July, George Atkins.[7]
  • 1719, August, Edward Franks.[8]

Storekeeper at Lisbon

  • 1706, William Jones.[9]
  • 1716-1719, George Atkins.[10]
  • 1719-1735, Edward Franks.[11]
  • 1735-1738, Christopher Robinson.[12]

Victualling Board Officers of the Yard

The senior officers of a victualling yard were the agent victualler (in larger establishments only), the storekeeper or naval officer, and the clerk of the cheque. The victualling yards reported to a Victualling Board, which in turn reported to the Navy Board.[13]

Agent Victualler at Lisbon

  • 1718, John Sargent. [14]
  • 1814, Robert Johnson. (appointed by the Victualling Board).[15]

Footnotes

  1. Day, John. Frederick. (April 2012). British Admiralty Control and Naval Power in the Indian Ocean (1793-1815) (Volume 1 of 2): a Thesis submitted for the Degree Doctor of Philosophy in Maritime History. University of Exeter. pp. 39-40.
  2. Day. pp. 39-40.
  3. Day. pp. 39-40.
  4. Day. pp. 39-40.
  5. Archives, The National (1567–1956). "Royal Naval Dockyard Staff". The National Archives. Kew, London: National Archives UK. Retrieved 8 August 2019.
  6. Harrison, Simon (2010–2018). "Master Attendant at Lisbon". threedecks.org. S. Harrison. Retrieved 7 August 2019.
  7. Harrison, Simon (2010–2018). "Clerk of the Cheque at Lisbon". threedecks.org. S. Harrison. Retrieved 7 August 2019.
  8. Harrison.
  9. Collinge, J.M. "Alphabetical list of officials: A-J British History Online". www.british-history.ac.uk. London, England.: University of London. pp. 81–116. Retrieved 12 December 2019.
  10. Harrison, Simon (2010–2018). "Storekeeper at Lisbon". threedecks.org. S. Harrison. Retrieved 7 August 2019.
  11. Harrison.
  12. Harrison.
  13. National Archives UK.
  14. Morriss, Roger (2010). The Foundations of British Maritime Ascendancy: Resources, Logistics and the State, 1755–1815. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 293. ISBN 9781139494892.
  15. Office, Admiralty (December 1814). The Navy List. London: John Murray. p. 133.

Bibliography

  1. Day, John. Frederick. (April 2012). British Admiralty Control and Naval Power in the Indian Ocean (1793-1815) (Volume 1 of 2): a Thesis submitted for the Degree Doctor of Philosophy in Maritime History. University of Exeter.
  2. Harrison, Simon (2010–2018). "Clerk of the Cheque at Lisbon". threedecks.org. S. Harrison. Retrieved 7 August 2019.
  3. Harrison, Simon (2010–2018). "Master Attendant at Lisbon". threedecks.org. S. Harrison. Retrieved 7 August 2019.
  4. Harrison, Simon (2010–2018). "Storekeeper at Lisbon". threedecks.org. S. Harrison. Retrieved 7 August 2019.
  5. Office, Admiralty (December 1814). The Navy List. London: John Murray.