Joint War Air Committee

From Naval History Archive
Jump to navigationJump to search
Joint War Air Committee
United Kingdom
Agency overview
FormedFebruary, 1916
Preceding agency
DissolvedMay, 1916
Superseding department
JurisdictionGovernment of the United Kingdom
HeadquartersWhitehall
London
Parent agencyHM Government

The Joint War Air Committee was appointed In February 1916 to co-ordinate the design and procurement activities of the the separate air services of the Admiralty and the War Office, replacing Air Committee. In May 1916 it was superseded by an Air Board.[1]

History

By 1916 the lack of co-ordination of the Army's Royal Flying Corps and the Navy's Royal Naval Air Service had led to serious problems, not only in the procurement of aircraft engines, but also in the air defence of Great Britain.[2] It was the supply problems to which an attempt at rectification was first made. The War Committee meeting on 15 February 1916 decided immediately to establish a standing joint naval and military committee to co-ordinate both the design and the supply of materiel for the two air services. This committee was titled the Joint War Air Committee, and its chairman was Lord Derby.[3] It was also at the meeting on 15 February that Curzon proposed the creation of an Air Ministry. As with the pre-war Air Committee, the Joint War Air Committee lacked any executive powers and therefore was not effective. After only eight sittings, Lord Derby resigned from the Committee, stating that "It appears to me quite impossible to bring the two wings closer together ... unless and until the whole system of the Air Service is changed and they are amalgamated into one service."[4][5]

Members of the Joint War Air Committee

The Joint War Air Committee was composed as follows:

Advisory Members were also appointed as required.

Footnotes

  1. "Records created or inherited by the Air Ministry, the Royal Air Force, and related bodies". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Kew, London: National Archives UK. 1862–1992. Retrieved 18 September 2019.
  2. National Archives UK.
  3. National Archives UK.
  4. Boyle, Andrew (1962). "Chapter 8". Trenchard Man of Vision. St. James's Place London: Collins. p. 173.
  5. National Archives UK.

Bibliography

  1. "Records created or inherited by the Air Ministry, the Royal Air Force, and related bodies". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Kew, London: National Archives UK. 1862–1992. Retrieved 18 September 2019.