First Sea Lord

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Office of the First Sea Lord
Ensign of the Royal Navy animated.gif
Admiral Tony Radakin.jpg
Incumbent
Admiral Anthony D. Radakin

since June 2019
Ministry of Defence, Navy Command
Abbreviation1SL
Member ofDefence Council
Admiralty Board
Navy Board
Reports toChief of the Defence Staff
NominatorSecretary of State for Defence
AppointerPrime Minister
Subject to formal approval by the Queen-in-Council
Term lengthNot fixed (typically 3–4 years)
FormationSenior Naval Lord (1689–1771)
First Naval Lord (1771–1904)
First Sea Lord (1904-1917)
First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff (1917–present)
First holderAdmiral Sir John R. Jellicoe
DeputyVice Chief of Naval Staff
(1941–1946)
Deputy Chief of Naval Staff
(1946–1968)
(2012–current)
WebsiteOfficial Website

The First Sea Lord or 1st Sea Lord or (1SL) the office was first established in 1904 when it superseded the former office of First Sea Lord. Originally created in 1689 under the title Senior Naval Lord, the officer holder is the senior naval officer on the Defence Council Admiralty Board and the Navy Board. Since 1917 the officer holder holds the additional joint title of Chief of Naval Staff and is the professional head of the Royal Navy.

His immediate deputy was the Deputy First Sea Lord from (1917-1919,) and again from (1942-1946). In his current additional role as Chief of Naval Staff he is supported by the Deputy Chief of Naval Staff.

History

The origin of the appointment dates to 1689 when it was known as the Senior Naval Lord until 1771 when that office holders title was changed to First Naval Lord, that post continued until 1904 when it was altered to First Sea Lord. In 1917, the office of the First Sea Lord was given an additional joint title of Chief of Naval Staff following the establishment of the Admiralty Naval Staff. All previous office holders were the senior naval member onf the Board of Admiralty, and served as chief naval adviser to the First Lord of the Admiralty, the minister responsible to Crown and Parliament for the Navy.[1]

From 1923 onward, the First Sea Lord was a member of the Chiefs of Staff Committee,[2] and from 1923 to 1959, in rotation with the representatives of the other services (the Chief of the Imperial General Staff and Chief of the Air Staff), he would serve as the chairman of that committee and head of all British armed forces. The title was retained when the Board of Admiralty was abolished in 1964 and the Board's functions were integrated into the Ministry of Defence.[3] Under the current organisation, the First Sea Lord sits on the Defence Council,[4] the Admiralty Board[4] and the Navy Board.[5]

Office Holders

Included:

  1. Admiral of the Fleet Sir John Fisher, 21 October 1904 – 25 January, 1910.[6]
  2. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Arthur Wilson, 25 January, 1910 - 5 December, 1911.[7]
  3. Admiral Sir Francis Bridgeman, 5 December, 1911 - 9 December, 1912.[8]
  4. Admiral Prince Louis of Battenberg, 9 December, 1912 - 30 October, 1914.[9]
  5. Admiral of the Fleet Sir John Fisher, 30 October, 1914 - 15 May, 1915.[10]
  6. Admiral Sir Henry Jackson, 15 May, 1915 - 30 November, 1916.[11]
  7. Admiral Sir John R. Jellicoe, 30 November, 1916, – 10 January 1918.[12]
  8. Admiral Sir Rosslyn E. Wemyss, 10 January, 1918 – 1 November, 1919. [13]
  9. Admiral of the Fleet The Rt. Hon. The Earl Beatty, 1 November, 1919. [14]
  10. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Charles E. Madden, Bart., 30 July, 1927 – 30 July, 1930. [15]
  11. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Frederick L. Field, 30 July, 1930 – 21 January, 1933. [16]
  12. Admiral of the Fleet The Rt. Hon. The Lord Chatfield, 21 January, 1933 – 7 September, 1938.[17]
  13. Admiral Sir Roger R. C. Backhouse, 7 September, 1938. [18]
  14. Admiral of the Fleet Sir A. Dudley P. R. Pound, 12 June, 1939.[19]
  15. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Andrew B. Cunningham, 15 October, 1943.[20]
  16. Admiral of the Fleet Sir John H. D. Cunningham, 10 June, 1946 – 6 September, 1948. [21]
  17. Admiral of the Fleet Lord Bruce A. Fraser, September, 1948 – December, 1951.[22]
  18. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Rhoderick R. McGrigor, December, 1951 – April, 1955.[23]
  19. Admiral of the Fleet Earl Mountbatten of Burma: April 1955-May 1959.[24]
  20. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Charles E. Lambe: May 1959-May 1960.[25]
  21. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Caspar John: May 1960-August 1963.[26]
  22. Admiral Sir J. David Luce: August 1963-1966.[27]
  23. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Varyl C. Begg: March 1966-August 1968.[28]
  24. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Michael Le Fanu: August 1968-July 1970.[29]
  25. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Peter J. Hill-Norton: July 1970-March 1971.[30]
  26. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Michael P. Pollock: March 1971-March 1974.[31]
  27. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Edward B. Ashmore: March 1974-March 1977.[32]
  28. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Terence T. Lewin: March 1977-July 1979.[33]
  29. Admiral of the Fleet Sir Henry C. Leach: July 1979-December 1982.[34]
  30. Admiral of the Fleet Sir John D.E. Fieldhouse: December 1982-August 1985.[35]
  31. Admiral of the Fleet Sir William D.M. Staveley: August 1985-May 1989.[36]
  32. Admiral of the Fleet Sir J.Julian R. Oswald: May 1989-March 1992.[37]
  33. Admiral of the Fleet Sir D. Benjamin Bathurst: March 1992-July 1995.[38]
  34. Admiral Sir Jock C.K. Slater: July 1995-October 1998.[39]
  35. Admiral Sir Michael C. Boyce: October 1998-January 2001.[40]
  36. Admiral Sir Nigel R. Essenhigh: January 2001-September 2002.[41]
  37. Admiral Sir Alan W.J. West: September 2002-February 2006.[42]
  38. Admiral Sir Jonathon Band: February 2006-July 2009.[43]
  39. Admiral Sir Mark Stanhope: July 2009-April 2013.[44]
  40. Admiral Sir George M. Zambellas: April 2013-April 2016.[45]
  41. Admiral Sir Philip A. Jones: April 2016- 2019.[46]
  42. Admiral Anthony D. Radakin: 2019-present.[47]

Footnotes

  1. Harley, Simon; Lovell, Tony (17 December 2018). "First Sea Lord - The Dreadnought Project". www.dreadnoughtproject.org. England: Harley and Lovell. Retrieved 26 June 2019.
  2. Bramall, Lord; Fothergill Jackson, Sir William Godfrey (1992). The chiefs : the story of the United Kingdom chiefs of staff (1st ed.). London: Brassey's. p. 440. ISBN 9780080403700.
  3. Ministry of Defence (2012-12-10). "History of the Ministry of Defence, Ministry of Defence website" (PDF). Mod.uk. Retrieved 2013-06-03.
  4. 4.0 4.1 The Navy List, 1992, corrected to 31 March 1992, pub HMSO, ISSN 0141-6081 pages 4-5.
    The Navy List, 2008, compiled 3 September 2008, pub TSO, ISBN 978-0-11-773081-6 pages 4-5.
  5. "MOD Royal Navy". Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  6. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  7. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  8. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  9. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  10. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  11. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  12. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  13. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  14. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  15. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  16. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  17. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  18. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  19. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  20. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  21. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  22. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  23. Harley and Lovell. 2018
  24. Mackie, Colin (April 2019). "Royal Navy Senior Appointments from 1865" (PDF). gulabin.com. Scotland: C. Mackie. pp. 5–6. Retrieved 26 June 2019.
  25. Mackie. April 2019.
  26. Mackie. April 2019.
  27. Mackie. April 2019.
  28. Mackie. April 2019.
  29. Mackie. April 2019.
  30. Mackie. April 2019.
  31. Mackie. April 2019.
  32. Mackie. April 2019.
  33. Mackie. April 2019.
  34. Mackie. April 2019.
  35. Mackie. April 2019.
  36. Mackie. April 2019.
  37. Mackie. April 2019.
  38. Mackie. April 2019.
  39. Mackie. April 2019.
  40. Mackie. April 2019.
  41. Mackie. April 2019.
  42. Mackie. April 2019.
  43. Mackie. April 2019.
  44. Mackie. April 2019.
  45. Mackie. April 2019.
  46. Mackie. April 2019.
  47. Mackie. April 2019.