East Indies and Egypt Station

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East Indies and Egypt Station
HMS Highflyer
Ensign of the Royal Navy animated.gif
Active1913–1917
CountryFlag United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.gif United Kingdom
BranchNaval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
TypeStation
Part ofAdmiralty
Garrison/HQTrincomalee Dockyard, Ceylon
Commanders
In CommandCommander-in-Chief, East Indies and Egypt Station
FirstRear-Admiral Sir Richard Peirse.
LastRear-Admiral Rosslyn Wemyss.

The East Indies and Egypt Station was a major command of the British Royal Navy created in 1913, its main naval formation was known as the East Indies Squadron. Throughout its history it was unified with other major commands. It existed until 1917 when it was permanently deactivated. Command of the station was usually vested Rear-Admiral who was known at times as the Commander-in-Chief, East Indies and Egypt or Commander-in-Chief, East Indies and Egypt Station.[1]

History

The East Indies Station was a major command of the British Royal Navy created in 1744 by the Department of Admiralty, it was under the command of the Commander-in-Chief, East Indies. From 1832 to 1865 the area of responsibility of the station was enlarged to included China creating the East Indies and China Station. That command was abolished, when it next unified with the Cape of Good Hope Station to create the East Indies and Cape of Good Hope Station until 1867 before it was restored to its original naval command area. In 1913 it was unified again with the Egypt command to create the East Indies and Egypt Station until 1917 when it was restored to its original naval command area.

In Command

Commander-in-Chief, East Indies and Egypt Station

Commander-in-Chief, East Indies and Egypt Station
Rank Flag Name Term
1 Rear-Admiral Rear Admiral command Flag RN from 1864.png Sir Richard Peirse (1913–1915) [2]
2 Rear-Admiral Rear Admiral command Flag RN from 1864.png Rosslyn Wemyss (1916–1917) [3]

References

  1. Lieshout, Robert H. (2016). Britain and the Arab Middle East: World War I and its Aftermath. 433: Bloomsbury Publishing. p. London. ISBN 978-0-85772-729-9.
  2. Sheffy, Yigal (2014). British Military Intelligence in the Palestine Campaign, 1914-1918. Cambridge, England: Routledge. p. 66. ISBN 9781135245702.
  3. Parkinson, Jonathan (2018). The Royal Navy, China Station: 1864 - 1941: As seen through the lives of the Commanders in Chief. Leicester, England: Troubador Publishing Ltd. p. 312. ISBN 9781788035217.