Devonport Dockyard

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HM Royal Dockyard, Devonport
Ensign of the Royal Navy animated.gif
Devonport in England
Site information
OwnerAdmiralty (1843-1964)
Navy Department (1964-1970)
OperatorRoyal Navy
Controlled byBoard of Admiralty Flag 20th Century.png Board of Admiralty (1843-1970)
Site history
In use1843-1970
Installation information
Past
commanders
Admiral-Superintendent, Plymouth Dockyard (1843-1846)
Admiral-Superintendent, Devonport Dockyard (1846-1970)

Devonport Dockyard or formally HM Royal Dockyard, Devonport and previously known as Plymouth Dockyard, was a Royal Naval Dockyard of the Devonport Station from 1843 to 1893, then later the Plymouth Station that was used by Royal Navy from 1893 until December 1970 when it was re designated Devonport Naval Base.

History

The pre-eminent yard, alongside Portsmouth, during the wars with France (1793 onwards). previously known as Plymouth Dockyard. Significant expansion for steam engineering, 1844–53 and 1896-1907. Shipbuilding ceased in 1971, but the Yard remains active as a Naval Base for maintenance and repairs. It was a component of the Devonport Station from (1845-1893) then later as part of the Plymouth Station that was used by Royal Navy from 1893 until July 1969 when it was re designated Devonport Naval Base.

Management of the dockyard

From 1690 until 1832 oversight of the local Royal Naval Dockyard (if any); Dockyards (including ships laid up 'in ordinary') were overseen by an independent Navy Board official: called a Resident Commissioner of the Navy. In the fulfilment of his duties each commssioner was assisted by five then later six principle officers of the dockyard establishment these included the Master-Attendant, Master-Shipwright, Storekeeper, Clerk of the Cheque, Clerk of the Ropeyard, and Clerk of the Survey.[1]

By An Order in Council dated 27 June 1832 the role of the Commissioner and the Navy Board was abolished previously dockyards were supervised by a Resident Commissioner of the Navy, everything except the Gun Wharves were brought under the direct control of the Department of Admiralty. A serving Royal Navy Officer, usually of Rear-Admiral rank, was appointed as Admiral-Superintendent of the Dockyard however the post was sometimes held by a Commodore-Superintendent or even a Vice-Admiral. They were responsible for all the civilian support services operated by the Dockyard Departments..[2]

In Command

Note:Plymouth Dockyard was not renamed to Devonport Dockyard until 1843 the admiral superintendents title remained as Admiral-Superintendent, Plymouth Dockyard until it was renamed in 1846.

Admiral-Superintendent, Plymouth Dockyard (1837-1846)

Admiral-Superintendent, Devonport Dockyard (1846-1970)

References

  1. Bateman, Michael; Riley, Raymond (2015). The Geography of Defence. Cambridge: Routledge. p. 104. ISBN 9781317333951.
  2. Writer.), E. MILES (Nautical; Miles, Lawford (1841). An epitome, historical and statistical, descriptive of the Royal Naval Service of England. By E. M., with the assistance of ... L. Miles ... With ... illustrations, etc. Ackermann & Company. p. 88.