Deputy Judge Advocate of the Fleet

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Office of the Deputy Judge Advocate of the Fleet
Board of Admiralty Flag 20th Century.png
Department of the Admiralty, Navy Department
Reports toFirst Sea Lord
NominatorFirst Lord of the Admiralty, Secretary of State for Defence
AppointerPrime Minister
Subject to formal approval by the Queen-in-Council
Term lengthNot fixed (typically 1–5 years)
Inaugural holderJudge Advocate, J. Fowler
Formation1663-2003

The Deputy Judge-Advocate of the Fleet was the chief adviser on Courts-Martial questions in relation to the Royal Navy, and administered oaths to witnesses. Up to 1925 the office of the position was in Portsmouth Dockyard and afterwards it was located in the Royal Naval College, Greenwich.

History

This office, to which appointments were made by Admiralty warrant, was created in 1668. It was discontinued in 1679 as a result of the decision to retrench naval expenditure but was revived in 1684.[1] It was abolished in 1831 but was once again revived, on an nonsalaried basis, in 1843.[2] The Deputy Judge-Advocate of the Fleet was the chief adviser on Courts-Martial questions in relation to the Royal Navy, and administered oaths to witnesses. Up to 1925 the office of the position was in Portsmouth Dockyard and afterwards it was located in the Royal Naval College, Greenwich.

Office Holders

Included:[3][4]

  1. Joseph Smith, 1668-1675.[5]
  2. James Southerne, 1675-1677.[6]
  3. William Hewer. 1677-1684.[7]
  4. John Walbanke. 1684-1687.[8]
  5. Samuel Atkins, 1687-1689.[9]
  6. Matthew Tindall, 1689, 30 May-8 November.[10]
  7. Cloudesley Jenkins, 1689, 8 November - 1692. [11]
  8. Samuel Pett, 1692-1693.[12]
  9. Josiah Burchett, 1693-1694. [13]
  10. George Larkin, 1694-1697.[14]
  11. John Fawler, 1697-1703.[15]
  12. William Rock, 1703-1707.[16]
  13. Mossom Ferrabosco, 1707, 10 January-2 December.[17]
  14. Edward Honywood, 1707, 2 December - 1714.[18]
  15. John Copeland, 1714-1724.[19]
  16. William Bell, 1724-1740.[20]
  17. Thomas Kempe, 1740-1743.[21]
  18. Charles Fearne, 1743-1744.[22]
  19. Edmund Mason, 1744-1745.[23]
  20. George Atkins, 1745-1754.[24]
  21. John Clevland, 1754-1762.[25]
  22. Richard Higgens, 1762-1780.[26]
  23. Thomas Binsteed, 1780-1804.[27]
  24. Moses Greetham, 1804-1843.[28]
  25. George Lamburn Greetham, 1843-1856.[29]
  26. William John Hellyer, 1856-1861. [30]
  27. William Eastlake, 1861-?[31]
  28. Paymaster Rear-Admiral Frederick J. Krabbé, 1908.
  29. Paymaster Rear-Admiral Henry W. E. Manisty. 1925.
  30. Paymaster Rear-Admiral Herbert S. Measham, 1927.
  31. Paymaster Captain Martin G. Bennett, 1930.
  32. Paymaster Captain John Siddalls, 1933.
  33. Paymaster Captain Archibald F. Cooper, 1935-1939.

Footnotes

  1. Sainty, J. C. (1975). "Deputy Judge Advocate of the Fleet 1668-1870: British History Online". www.british-history.ac.uk. London: University of London. p. 81. Retrieved 29 June 2019.
  2. Sainty. p.81.
  3. Sainty, J. C. (1975). "Alphabetical list of officials: A-J, British History Online". www.british-history.ac.uk. London: University of London. pp. 106–135. Retrieved 29 June 2019.
  4. Sainty, J.C. (1975). "Alphabetical list of officials: K-Z, British History Online". www.british-history.ac.uk. London: University of London. pp. 135–159. Retrieved 29 June 2019.
  5. Sainty. p.81.
  6. Sainty. p.81.
  7. Sainty. p.81.
  8. Sainty. p.81.
  9. Sainty. p.81.
  10. Sainty. p.81.
  11. Sainty. p.81.
  12. Sainty. p.81.
  13. Sainty. p.81.
  14. Sainty. p.81.
  15. Sainty. p.81.
  16. Sainty. p.81.
  17. Sainty. p.81.
  18. Sainty. p.81.
  19. Sainty. p.81.
  20. Sainty. p.81.
  21. Sainty. p.81.
  22. Sainty. p.81.
  23. Sainty. p.81.
  24. Sainty. p.81.
  25. Sainty. p.81.
  26. Sainty. p.81.
  27. Sainty. p.81.
  28. Sainty. p.81.
  29. Sainty. p.81.
  30. Sainty. p.81.
  31. Sainty. p.81.

Bibliography

  1. Sainty, J. C. (1975). "Deputy Judge Advocate of the Fleet 1668-1870: British History Online". www.british-history.ac.uk. London: University of London. Retrieved 29 June 2019.