Commodore First Class, Indian Navy (British India)

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Commodore First Class
Commodore 1st class of the Indian Navy 1848 - 1858.gif
Broad Pennant of a Commodore 1st class of the Indian Navy (1848-1958) Image by Martin Grieve
CountryBritish India
Service branchIndian Navy (British India)
AbbreviationCdre 1c
RankOne-star
Formation1847-1858
Next higher rankRear-Admiral

Commodore First Class, Indian Navy (British India) was a rank introduced in 1847 when the Superintendent of the Indian Navy, was made Commander-in-Chief of the Indian Navy, and hoisted the broad pennant of a Royal Navy Commodore 1st Class. On 14 June 1848 the Admiralty authorised a special broad pennant, Commodore 1st Class Indian Navy, for the use of the Commander-in-Chief Indian Navy.

History

In 1829 the Bombay Marine was renamed the Bombay Marine Corps. On 1 May 1830, the Bombay Marine became the Indian Navy by Government Order, and in 1858 became known as H.M. Indian Navy controlled by the government of India and based at Bombay.[1]

In 1847 the Superintendent of the Indian Navy, was made Commander-in-Chief of the Indian Navy, and hoisted the broad pennant of a Commodore 1st Class of the Royal Navy on his flag ship in Bombay Harbour. His right to do this was disputed.[2] H.M. Indian Navy co-operated with the Royal Navy in policing Asian waters and also carried out regular marine surveys.[3]

On 14 June 1848 the Admiralty authorised a special broad pennant, Commodore 1st Class Indian Navy, for the use of the Commander-in-Chief Indian Navy. The Commander of the Persian Gulf Squadron, who assumed the rank of Commodore 2nd Class, had a similar broad pennant in blue. In 1858 the Indian Navy was renamed H.M. Indian Navy, but both pennants went out of use in April 1863 Her Majesty's Indian Navy was disbanded and the naval protection of Indian Waters was taken over by the British Admiralty in London.

In 1892 the broad pennant was revived to as standard of the Director of the Royal Indian Marine when aboard Indian Navy ships until 1904 when its design was altered.

References

  1. "The Royal Indian Navy 1612 to 1947 Association - National Maritime Museum". collections.rmg.co.uk. Greenwich, London, England.: Royal Museums Greenwich. Retrieved 14 June 2021.
  2. National Archives UK.
  3. National Archives UK.