Commodore, Amphibious Forces, Far East Fleet

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Commodore, Amphibious Forces, Far East Fleet
Ensign of the Royal Navy animated.gif
Ensign of the Royal Navy
Navy Department
AbbreviationCOMAFFEF
Reports toCommander, Far East Fleet
NominatorSecretary of State for Defence
AppointerPrime Minister
Subject to formal approval by the Queen-in-Council
Formation1965
First holderCommodore Hardress Llewellyn (Harpy) Lloyd
Final holderCommodore Derek William Napper
Abolished1971

The Commodore, Amphibious Forces, Far East Fleet, (COMAFFEF) [1] was a senior Royal Navy flag appointment the office holder commanded Amphibious Forces, Far East Fleet based at HMNB Singapore from May 1965 to March 1971.

History

The Royal Navy established an Amphibious Warfare Squadron in March 1961 that was assigned to the Persian Gulf Station until August 1962. It then became a component of under the Flag Officer, Middle East until April 1965. The squadron was then transferred to the Far East where it was renamed Amphibious Forces (Far East Fleet) under the new Commodore, Amphibious Forces, Far East Fleet in May 1965.[2] The post was discontinued in March 1971.

Office Holders

Included:[3]

Commodore, Amphibious Forces, Far East Fleet
Rank Flag Name Term
1 Commodore Commodore command flag RN from 1954.png Hardress Llewellyn (Harpy) Lloyd May 1965 - May 1966
2 Commodore Commodore command flag RN from 1954.png David A. Dunbar-Nasmith May 1966 - July 1967
3 Commodore Commodore command flag RN from 1954.png E. Gerard N. Mansfield July 1967 - November 1968
4 Commodore Commodore command flag RN from 1954.png Thomas Wathen Stocker November 1968 - September 1970
5 Commodore Commodore command flag RN from 1954.png Derek William Napper September 1970 - March 1971

References

  1. Mackie, Colin (February 2020). "Royal Navy Senior Appointments from 1865". gulabin. C. Mackie. p. 222. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  2. Watson, Dr Graham (12 July 2015). "Royal Navy Organisation and Ship Deployment 1947-2013". www.naval-history.net. Gordon Smith. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  3. Mackie. p.222.