Commander-in-Chief of the English Armed Forces

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Office of the Commander-in-Chief of the English Armed Forces
Coat-of-arms-of-Anne-as-Queen-of-England-and-Government-of-England-1702-to-1707.png
Member ofGovernment of the Kingdom of England and Privy Council of England
Term lengthFixed for life
Formation927–1707

The Commander-in-Chief of the English Armed Forces, also referred to as Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Crown,[1] was a constitutional role vested in the English Monarch, who as Head of State was the "Head of the English Armed Forces from 927 to 1707.

History

The Commander-in-Chief of the English Armed Forces, also referred to as Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Crown,[2] was a constitutional role vested in the English Monarch, who as Head of State was the "Head of the English Armed Forces from 927 to 1707. The Monarch of England was the supreme authority of the English military, that consisted of two service branches the English Army and Navy Royal. The monarch exercised their Royal Prerogative in relation to key decisions on the use of the armed forces. This was after consultation and advice from their Chief Minister as head of the English Government individually or in committee with the Privy Council of England.

Footnotes

  1. Wade, Emlyn Capel Stewart; Phillips, George Godfrey (1931). Constitutional Law: An Outline of the Law and Practice of the Constitution, Including English Local Government, the Constitutional Relations of the British Empire and the Church of England, by E. C. S. Wade... and G. Godfrey Phillips ... London: Longmans, Green and Company. p. 68.
  2. Wade. p.68.