Commander-in-Chief, Naval Home Command

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Commander-in-Chief, Naval Home Command
Ensign of the Royal Navy animated.gif
Ministry of Defence
AbbreviationCINCNAVHOME
Member ofAdmiralty Board, Navy Board, Navy Command
Reports toFirst Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff
NominatorSecretary of State for Defence
AppointerPrime Minister
Subject to formal approval by the Queen-in-Council
Term lengthNot fixed (typically 1–4 years)
PrecursorCommander-in-Chief, Plymouth
and
Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth
FormationJuly, 1969
First holderAdmiral Sir John Frewen
Final holderVice-Admiral Sir Charles Montgomery
AbolishedOctober, 2012
SuccessionFirst Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff

The Commander-in-Chief, Naval Home Command[1] was a senior Royal Navy post that existed from 1969 to 2012. Naval Home Command was a name given to the military formation administered by the post.

History

Prior to the formation of this command the Royal Navy has usually been split into several commands, each with its own Commander-in-Chief. In July 1969 Naval Home Command was created following the Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth and Commander-in-Chief, Plymouth being combined to create the single new post of Commander-in-Chief, Naval Home Command (CINCNAVHOME). In 1994 the post of Commander-in-Chief Naval Home Command was held jointly with that of the Second Sea Lord following the rationalisation of the British Armed Forces following the end of the Cold War. In 2012, separate existing senior commands were discontinued, with full operational command being vested instead in the First Sea Lord.

Responsibilities

The Commander-in-Chief was responsible for maintaining operational capability by providing correctly trained manpower to the fleet, the office existed from 1969 to 2012.[2]

Office Holders

Included:[3][4]

In 2012 the appointment of separate Commanders-in-Chief was discontinued with full operational command being transferred to the First Sea Lord.

Subordinate Flag Officers

References

  1. Eberle, Sir James (2007). Wider horizons: naval policy & international affairs. Durham, England: Roundtuit Publishing. p. 40. ISBN 9781904499176.
  2. Heyman, Charles (2006). The Armed Forces of the United Kingdom 2007–2008. Oxford, England: Casemate Publishers. p. 62. ISBN 9781844154890.
  3. Mackie, Colin (April 2019). "Royal Navy Senior Appointments from 1865" (PDF). gulabin.com. Scotland: C. Mackie. pp. 7–8. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  4. Mackie, Colin (April 2019). "Royal Navy Senior Appointments from 1865" (PDF). gulabin.com. Scotland: C. Mackie. pp. 66–67. Retrieved 29 September 2019.

Sources

  • Eberle, Sir James (2007). Wider horizons: naval policy & international affairs. Durham, England: Roundtuit Publishing. ISBN 9781904499176.
  • Heyman, Charles (2006). The Armed Forces of the United Kingdom 2007–2008. Oxford, England: Casemate Publishers. ISBN 9781844154890.
  • Mackie, Colin (2017). "British Armed Forces: Royal Navy Appointments from 1865" (PDF). gulabin.com. Scotland, UK.