Coast of Ireland Station

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Coast of Ireland Station
HMS Colleen
Ensign of the Royal Navy animated.gif
Active1876-1919
CountryFlag United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.gif United Kingdom
AllegianceBritish Empire
BranchNaval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
TypeStation
RoleArea of Responsibility
Part ofAdmiralty
Station HQQueenstown, Ireland
Commanders
FirstRear-Admiral Henry Hillyar.
LastAdmiral Sir Lewis Bayly.

The Coast of Ireland Station also known as the Irish Command was a major naval naval command area of the British Royal Navy created in 1876 following a renaming of the earlier Ireland Station. In 1919 it was renamed the Western Approaches Station.[1]

History

The Admiralty established a semi permanent naval command in 1758 called the Irish Station. In 1797 it became a permanent station of the Royal Navy. Successive commanding officers were titled by different names such as Commander-in-Chief, Cork, Commander-in-Chief, on the Coast of Ireland, Commander-in-Chief, Cobh and finally Commander-in-Chief, Queenstown.

In 1876 Ireland Station was renamed to Coast of Ireland Station and at the same the title of the former stations commanding officer was altered from Commander-in-Chief, Queenstown to Senior Officer on the Coast of Ireland.

The stations HQ was at Queenstown, Ireland. The station was remained under the control and direction of the Senior Officer on the Coast of Ireland from 1876 until 15 June, 1917 when his title was altered to Commander-in-Chief, Coast of Ireland.[1] In 1919 the Coast of Ireland Station was renamed the Western Approaches Station.[1]

Naval HQ

Queenstown Harbour in 1915
Royal Navy ships at Queenstown circa 1893 to 1896

Senior Officer on the Coast of Ireland (1876-1917)

  1. Vice-Admiral Henry S. Hillyar, 1876 – 1878.[1]
  2. Vice-Admiral William M. Dowell, 26 September, 1878.[1]
  3. Rear-Admiral Richard V. Hamilton, 6 April, 1880.[1]
  4. Rear-Admiral Thomas B. Lethbridge, 1883.[1]
  5. Vice-Admiral Henry D. Hickley, 1885 – 1 January, 1887.[1]
  6. Rear-Admiral Walter C. Carpenter, 1 January, 1887 – 31 December, 1888.[1]
  7. Rear-Admiral James E. Erskine, 31 December, 1888 – 1 January, 1892.[1]
  8. Rear-Admiral Henry C. St. John, 1 January, 1892 – 1 January, 1895.[1]
  9. Vice-Admiral Claude E. Buckle, 1 January, 1895 – 5 January, 1898.[1]
  10. Rear-Admiral Atwell P. MacL. Lake, 4 January, 1898 – 31 January, 1901.[1]
  11. Rear-Admiral Edmund F. Jeffreys, 2 February, 1901 – 1 February, 1904.[1]
  12. Vice-Admiral Angus MacLeod, 1 February, 1904 – 1 March, 1906.[1]
  13. Rear-Admiral George F. King-Hall, 28 February, 1906 – 30 July, 1908.[1]
  14. Vice-Admiral Sir Alfred W. Paget, 30 July, 1908 – 18 April, 1911.[1]
  15. Vice-Admiral Sir Charles H. Coke, 18 April, 1911 – 21 April, 1914.[1]
  16. Vice-Admiral Robert H. S. Stokes, 21 April, 1914 – 24 April, 1914.[1]
  17. Vice-Admiral Sir Charles H. Coke, 19 May, 1914 – 20 July, 1915.[1]
  18. Vice-Admiral Sir Lewis Bayly, 20 July, 1915 - 1917.[1]

Commander-in-Chief, Coast of Ireland (1917-1919)

  1. Admiral Sir Lewis Bayly 1917 - 1919.[1]

Additional Notes

From 1903 until 1919 the Senior Officer on the Coast of Ireland later Commander-in-Chief, Coast of England held additional titles and responsibilities as Deputy to the Admiral Commanding, Coastguard and Reserves for Coastguard Duty in Ireland.[1]

Components

At various times it encompassed naval formations and other ships not attached to other fleets. In addition to shore establishments including, barracks, dockyards, depots, hospitals, refitting and re-supply bases, naval bases or victualling yards.

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 1.19 1.20 1.21 1.22 Harley, Simon; Lovell, Tony (12 April 2018). "Coast of Ireland - The Dreadnought Project". www.dreadnoughtproject.org. England: Harley and Lovell. Retrieved 13 March 2020.