Coast Guard Office

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Coast Guard Office
Flag of the Lord High Admiral of the United Kingdom.svg
Office overview
Formed1856
Dissolved1923
JurisdictionUnited Kingdom Government of the United Kingdom
HeadquartersVictoria Street
London
England
Office executive
Parent OfficeDepartment of Admiralty

The Coast Guard Office was established in 1856 when control of the coastguard transferred from Board of Customs to the Board of Admiralty. In April 1923 control of the Coastguard Service passed to the Mercantile Marine Department of the Board of Trade. [1]

The office was first superintended by the Controller-General of the Coastguard and finally by the Admiral Commanding Coastguard and Reserves.

From this headquarters it superintended the Coast Guard Service, the Royal Naval Reserve and Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve.

History

The Preventive Waterguard was instituted in 1809 under three inspecting commanders. In 1816 the Preventive Waterguard passed to the direct control of the Treasury. It was then considerably altered and extended, becoming the principal force for protection of the revenue on the coast. In 1817 and 1818 the preventive waterguard was withdrawn from Kent and Sussex coasts and replaced there by the Coast Blockade under the Admiralty. By Treasury minute of 15 January 1822 the Comptroller-General of the Preventive Waterguard and his staff, and the Admiralty and Excise revenue cruisers, were transferred to the Board of Customs. The Preventive Waterguard, renamed the Coastguard in 1822, was thereafter extended to the whole of the United Kingdom.[2]

The establishment for the prevention of smuggling thereafter consisted of the revenue cruisers, the Coastguard at the several stations along the coast, and the riding officers or land guard, all under the orders and superintendence of the Controller-General of the Coastguard, who operated from a Coastguard Office at headquarters.In 1856 superintendence of the Controller-General of the Coastguard was transferred from the Board of Customs to the Admiralty.[3]

In 1869 the office of Controller-General was abolished, control of the Coastguard passing to a Chief of the Staff and then in 1874 to the Admiral Superintendent of Naval Reserves and from 1903 the Admiral Commanding Coastguard and Reserves, both of whom were responsible to the First Sea Lord. In April 1923 control of the Coast Guard Service passed to the Mercantile Marine Department of the Board of Trade. During World War Two in May 1940 control of the Coast Guard Service was restored to the Department of Admiralty until October 1945.

In Command

Controller-General of the Coastguard (1856-1869)

Chief of the Staff of the Coastguard (1869-1875)

Admiral Superintendent of Naval Reserves (1875-1903)

Admiral Commanding, Coastguard and Reserves (1903-1923)

Principal Staff Officers

Assistant to Admiral Superintendent of Naval Reserves (1879-1903)

Assistant to Admiral Commanding Coastguard and Reserves (1903-1923)

Component Units

Coast Guard Service

The Coast Guard Service, known also as the Coastguard or Coast Guard, was a British coast defence force and naval reserve administered by the Admiralty between 1856 and 1923.

Royal Naval Reserve

The Royal Naval Reserve was established with the Naval Reserve Act of 1859 as a reserve force of able seamen, extended to include sea officers in 1862. In 1958 it was unified with the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve.

Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve

The Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (RNVR) was a reserve force of civilian volunteers established in 1903 and controlled and directed by this office until 1923.

Footnotes

  1. Archives, The National (2019). "Records of the Coastguard 1816-1947". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Kew, England: National Archives of the United Kingdom. Retrieved 7 July 2019.
  2. National Archives of the United Kingdom
  3. National Archives of the United Kingdom

Bibliography

  1. Archives, The National (2019). "Records of the Coastguard 1816-1947". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Kew, England: National Archives of the United Kingdom. Retrieved 7 July 2019.

Attribution

This article included some copied content that is available under the Open Government Licence v3.0.