Admiralty Secretariat

From Naval History Archive
Jump to navigationJump to search
Admiralty Secretariat
Board of Admiralty Flag 19th to early 20th Century.gif
Department overview
Formed1625
Dissolved1860
Superseding department
JurisdictionGovernment of the United Kingdom
HeadquartersAdmiralty Building
Whitehall
London
Department executives
Parent DepartmentDepartment of Admiralty

The Admiralty Secretariat also known as the Civil Department of the Navy [1] was established in 1625 it consisted of the offices the Secretary to the Admiralty later known as the First Secretary to the Admiralty, the Assistant Secretary to the Admiralty later known as the Second Secretary to the Admiralty who were the chief civil servants of the Admiralty and Marine Affairs Office later called the Department of Admiralty.[2]

The Admiralty Secretariat was responsible for coordinating all the work between all the branches, departments, divisions, offices, sections of the Department of Admiralty. In addition to distributing the Fleet and issuing orders to naval commanders.

History

The Admiralty Secretariat was established in 1625 it consisted of the offices the Secretary to Admiralty later known as the First Secretary to the Admiralty and the Assistant Secretary to the Admiralty later known as the Second Secretary to the Admiralty who were the chief civil servants of the Admiralty and Marine Affairs Office later called the Department of Admiralty.[3]

The Secretariat, was charged with carrying special duties that were not usually dealt with by other departments, it was also conduit from which departmental submissions would be submitted to the Board of Admiralty, when the board had reached a decision this was usually communicated back to all relevant departments by correspondences that had been written by the secretariat staff which was then signed by the Secretary.[4]

As this was the system that was operating no important decision could be made without the knowledge and approval of the Secretary's department. All orders from the Board of Admiralty were conveyed through this system and this department effectively became a center for official admiralty knowledge.[5]

To assist the secretaries in their responsibilities and duties civil service staff called Clerks of the Admiralty were first introduced in 1660, As the department grew a hierarchical system of distribution of work and a pathway for promotion was introduced from 1694 as a result of the creation of the Chief Clerk of Admiralty, later known as the Principal Clerk,[6] he then superintended the offices of the Clerks Office. An Extra Clerks Office was introduced in 1721 and then a Senior Clerks Office in 1800. From this point the clerical establishment at the admiralty was divided into First Class, Second Class and Third Class Clerks.[7]

The work of clerical establishment by the end of the eighteenth century chiefly involved writing. It consisted of copying orders and letters, issuing passes and protections, making out commissions and warrants, organizing convoys, dealing with applications for employment and appeals for promotions. [8] A clerical establishment of clerks was introduced into other admiralty departments as well as the departments and offices of the Navy Office.

Additionally the secretariat from its creation was responsible for the administrative superintendence of the various departments and offices that were located within the headquarters buildings of the Department of Admiralty and other Admiralty Departments.[9] In 1832 the Navy Board and subsequently Navy Office was abolished its staff and functions were absorbed into the Department of Admiralty. In the 19th century as the work of the admiralty departments was expanding the secretariats business started to subdivide into specialist branches one for each of the supervising naval lords. Four were introduced from 1832 the were the Military Branch handled the administrative business of the First Naval Lord, the Naval Branch, the Second Naval Lord, the Civil Branch the secretariat itself and the Legal Branch, the judicial department. In 1860 the secretariat became known as the Secretary's Department.[10]

Responsibilities

The Secretariat was responsible for all Naval Accounts, Estimates, Expenditure, Finance and Spending proposals under the Secretary of the Admiralty later First Secretary he was assisted by the Assistant Secretary of the Admiralty later Second Secretary who was responsible for all matters in relation to Naval Administration and the running of the secretariat itself.

Chief Clerk of Admiralty

Included:[11]

  1. Office of the Chief Clerks Office (1694-1870).[12]
  2. Office of the Principal Clerks Office

Clerical Establishment

  1. Clerks Office (1660-1800).[13]
  2. Extra Clerks Office (1721-1816).[14]
  3. Senior Clerks Office (1800-16).[15]
  4. First Class Clerks Office (1816-70).[16]
  5. Second Class Clerks Office (1816-70).[17]
  6. Third Class Clerks Office (1816-55).[18]
  7. Supernumerary Clerks Office (1811-16).[19]
  8. Third Class First Section Clerks Office (1855-70).[20]
  9. Third Class Second Section Clerks Office (1855-70).[21]

Departments at Admiralty Headquarters

  1. Head Messengers Office (1666-1870).[22]
  2. Porters Office (1676-1870).[23]
  3. Register Office (1696–1715).[24]
  4. Necessary Woman's Office (1694-1865).[25]
  5. Watchmens Office (1694-1832).[26]
  6. Messengers Office (1694-1806).[27]
  7. House Keepers Office (1697-1800).[28]
  8. Gardner's Office (1700-1827).[29]
  9. Office of the Private Secretary to the Lord High Admiral (1702-1707).[30]
  10. Clerk of the Journals Office (1738-1741).[31]
  11. Translators Office (1755-1869).[32]
  12. Marine Department (1755-1809).[33]
  13. Marine Pay Department (1755-1831).[34]
  14. Extra Messengers Office (1795-1806).[35]
  15. Naval Works Department (1796-1807).[36]
  16. Office of the Private Secretary to the First Lord of the Admiralty (1800–1910).[37]
  17. Board Room Messengers Office (1806-1868).[38]
  18. Admiralty Record Office (1809-).[39]
  19. Office of the Keeper of the Records (1809-1816).[40]
  20. Office of the Private Secretary to the Lord High Admiral (1827-1828).[41]
  21. Readers Office (1841-1870).[42]
  22. Admiralty Librarian (1862-1870).[43]
  23. Digest Writers Office (1863-1870).[44]
  24. Index Writers Office (1863-1870).[45]

Footnotes

  1. Office, Admiralty (December 1814). "Civil Department of the Navy". The Navy List. London: John Murray. p. 131.
  2. Cock, Randolph; Rodger, N. A. M (2008). A Guide to the Naval Records in the National Archives of The UK (PDF) (2 ed.). University of London School of advanced study Institute of Historical Research. p. 87.
  3. Sainty, J. C. (1975). "Introduction British History Online". www.british-history.ac.uk. London: University of London. pp. 1–17. Retrieved 18 July 2019.
  4. Sainty. pp.1-17.
  5. Sainty. pp.1-17.
  6. Hamilton, C. I. (Feb 3, 2011). The Making of the Modern Admiralty: British Naval Policy-Making, 1805–1927. Cambridge University Press. p. 290. ISBN 9781139496544.
  7. Sainty. pp.1-17.
  8. Rodger, N.A.M. (1979). The Admiralty. Lavenham: T. Dalton. p. 62. ISBN 0900963948.
  9. Sainty. pp.1-17.
  10. "Records of Secretary's Department". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Kew, England: National Archives UK. 1812–1968. Retrieved 19 July 2019.
  11. Sainty, J. C. (1975). "Office-Holders in Modern Britain: British History Online: Table of Contents". www.british-history.ac.uk. London: University of London. Retrieved 18 July 2019.
  12. Sainty. TOC.
  13. Sainty. TOC.
  14. Sainty. TOC.
  15. Sainty. TOC.
  16. Sainty. TOC.
  17. Sainty. TOC.
  18. Sainty. TOC.
  19. Sainty. TOC.
  20. Sainty. TOC.
  21. Sainty. TOC.
  22. Sainty. TOC.
  23. Sainty. TOC.
  24. Sainty. TOC.
  25. Sainty. TOC.
  26. Sainty. TOC.
  27. Sainty. TOC.
  28. Sainty. TOC.
  29. Sainty. TOC.
  30. Sainty. TOC.
  31. Sainty. TOC.
  32. Sainty. TOC.
  33. Sainty. TOC.
  34. Sainty. TOC.
  35. Sainty. TOC.
  36. Sainty. TOC.
  37. Sainty. TOC.
  38. Sainty. TOC.
  39. Sainty. TOC.
  40. Sainty. TOC.
  41. Sainty. TOC.
  42. Sainty. TOC.
  43. Sainty. TOC.
  44. Sainty. TOC.
  45. Sainty. TOC.

Bibliography

  1. Cock, Randolph; Rodger, N. A. M (2008). A Guide to the Naval Records in the National Archives of The UK (PDF) (2 ed.). University of London School of advanced study Institute of Historical Research.
  2. Hamilton, C. I. (Feb 3, 2011). The Making of the Modern Admiralty: British Naval Policy-Making, 1805–1927. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9781139496544.
  3. Office, Admiralty (December 1814). "Civil Department of the Navy". The Navy List. London: John Murray.
  4. Office-Holders in Modern Britain: Volume 4, Admiralty Officials 1660-1870, ed. J C Sainty (London, 1975), British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/office-holders/vol4 [accessed 18 July 2019].
  5. "Records of Secretary's Department". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Kew, England: National Archives UK. 1812–1968. Retrieved 19 July 2019.
  6. Rodger, N.A.M. (1979). The Admiralty. Lavenham: T. Dalton. ISBN 0900963948.