Brazil Station

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Brazil Station
Ensign of the Royal Navy animated.gif
Active1838-1846
CountryFlag of Brazil 1822 to 1870.png Empire of Brazil
AllegianceFlag United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.gif United Kingdom
BranchNaval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
TypeStation
Part ofAdmiralty
Garrison/HQRio de Janerio, Brazil
Commanders
FirstCommodore Thomas Sulivan
LastRear-Admiral Samuel Hood Inglefield

The Brazil Station [1] also refereed to as the Brazil's Station was a naval command area of the British Royal Navy created in 1838 as one of the geographical divisions into which the Royal Navy administered its worldwide responsibilities. It was defined so by the Admiralty to identify the area of responsibility of the Commander-in-Chief, Brazil Station.[2] It was formed from when the larger South America Station was divided into two Stations for operational purposes, the other being the Pacific Station. In 1846 it was renamed the South East Coast of America Station.

For command purposes the Royal Navy was divided into a number of major or local stations, fleets or other formations, each normally under an admiral or senior officer.[3]

History

The Brazil Station also known to as the Brazil's Station was a naval station and major command of the British Royal Navy created in 1838 here as one of the geographical divisions into which the Royal Navy administered its worldwide responsibilities. It was defined so by the Department of Admiralty to identify the area jurisdiction of the Commander-in-Chief, Brazil Station. It was formed from the larger South America Station was split into two Naval Stations for operational purposes and existed until 1846, when it was renamed the South East Coast of America Station.

In Command

Commander-in-Chief, Brazil Station

Additional Notes

Note from 1840 until 1844 the commander-in-chief of this station held the joint title of Commander-in-Chief, Cape of Good Hope Station.

Components

At various times it encompassed naval formations and other ships not attached to other fleets. In addition to shore establishments including, barracks, dockyards, depots, hospitals, refitting and re-supply bases, naval bases or victualling yards. Those components that were part of this station are shown below.

Formations

Unit From To Ref
name date date

Shore Establishments

Unit From To Ref
Rio de Janerio Dockyard 1813 1817 [4]

References

  1. Commons, House of (1843). "Correspondence on the Slave Trade with Foreign Powers Parties to Convention". Parliamentary Papers. London, England.: William Clowes and Son for H.M. Stationery Office: 310. Retrieved 9 December 2019.
  2. "General Report of the Emigration Commissioners, Volume 6". Emigration Commission. p. 390. Retrieved 9 December 2019.
  3. "Records of Stations and Fleets". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Kew, Surrey, England.: National Archives UK. 1702–1969. Retrieved 14 November 2019.
  4. Cock, Randolph; Rodger, N.A.M. (2008). A guide to the naval records in the National Archives of the UK (2nd ed.). London: University of London, Institute of Historical Research. p. 217. ISBN 9781905165391.