Bombay Dockyard

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HMI Naval Dockyard, Bombay
Ensign of the Royal Navy animated.gif
Part of East Indies Station
Bombay in India
TypeNaval Dockyard
Site information
OwnerAdmiralty
OperatorRoyal Indian Navy
Royal Navy
Controlled byFlag of the Navy Board 1801 to 1832.jpg Navy Board (1759-1832)
Board of Admiralty Flag 20th Century.png Board of Admiralty (1832-1949)
Site history
In use1670-1949
Installation information
Past
commanders
Various (multiple titles see opposite)
OccupantsEast India Marine
Bombay Marine
East Indies Squadron
Royal Indian Navy

Bombay Dockyard or formally His Majesty's Indian Dockyard, Bombay was originally a naval dockyard developed by the East India Company beginning in 1670. It was formally established as a Royal Naval Dockyard overseas in 1811 and a base of the East Indies Station when the Department of Admiralty in London took over it. The yard was initially managed by the Navy Board through its Resident Commissioner, Bombay until 1832 when administration of the yard was taken over by the Board of Admiralty, it was closed in 1949.

The yard was used by both the Royal Indian Navy and Royal Navy.

History

Britain's representation in the East Indies was dominated by the English East India Company formed in 1600.[1] The company created its own navy as early as 1613 and became known as the East India Marine and equipment for building ships at Bombay was sent directly from England.[2] Beginning in 1670 Bombay began to be developed as a shipyard and by 1686 Bombay had become the headquarters of the English East India Company and its fleet in India was renamed the Bombay Marine.[3] To support the Bombay Marine a refit yard was built with a supporting shore organisation consisting of a marine storekeeper, Mr. William Minchen, who was appointed in 1670 and a master shipbuilder Mr. Warwick Pett. The structure followed that of other Royal Navy Dockyards such as those in England where in the early 17th century the naval storekeeper and master shipwright were key posts.[4] The development in the administrative structure was notable for the combination of shore and ship establishments.[5]

In 1735 by the East India Company, brought in shipwrights from their base at Surat in order to construct vessels using Malabar teak. One of their number, Lovji Nusserwanjee Wadia, was (along with several generations of his descendants) a key figure in the success of the Yard, as indicated in The New Cambridge History of India: Science, Technology and Medicine in Colonial India[6] In 1742 a post of Superintendent of the Bombay Marine was created along with a Commodore, Bombay Marine and seven other commanders. The superintendent controlled the dockyard with the commodore reporting to him, a purser of the marine being in charge of accounts, a master builder, and storekeeper in charge of their departments.[7] Additionally in 1742 a Bombay Marine Board was established to administrate the dockyard consisting of the superintendent, the commodore and two senior captains as the facilities customers, and the superintendent’s deputy, the master attendant.[8]

In the first decade of the 19th century the Department of Admiralty in London gradually took over responsibility for the yard, and day to administration of the yard passed from the superintendent to the Navy Boards, Resident Commissioner Bombay, who continued working with the Wadia family as Master Shipwrights. There was much construction on the site around this time. Duncan Dock, which was the largest dry dock outside Europe at the time, was constructed in 1807–1810, and remains in use today. The main Dockyard building, which fronts onto Shahid Bhagat Singh Road, dates from 1807, as does the administration block. In 1832 the Navy Board was abolished and responsibility for the management of the yard passed to the Board of Admiralty.

The nearby Great Western Building (formerly Admiralty House) had housed the Port Admiral from around 1764–1792.

Administration of the Dockyard (Navy Board)

Plan of Bombay Dockyard in June, 1909. Source:British Empire Dockyards and Ports, The Dock Book, British Admiralty, H.M.S.O.
Jamsetjee Bomanjee (1756-1821) and Nourojee Jamsetjee (1774-1860), Parsi master shipbuilders.

From 1546 until 1660 all Royal Naval Dockyards were administered by the Council of the Marine. From 1660 were administered by a resident commissioner who supervised the other senior officers of the yard on behalf of the Navy Board in London. By an Order in Council dated 27 June 1832 it transferred administrative control of the dockyards organisation to the Board of Admiralty, and the role of the Resident Commissioner of the Navy was abolished and replaced by either a Captain Superintendent or Commodore Superintendent or Admiral-Superintendent depending on the size of the naval dockyard.[9][10] In 1971 all remaining flag officer's titled as admiral superintendent were renamed Port Admirals.

Superintendent Bombay Marine

Included:[11]

  • 1754, Captain Samuel Hough,
  • 1794–1801, Captain, Philip Dundas.
  • 1802–1804, Captain, Robert Anderson.
  • 1805–1810, Captain, William Taylor Money. (remained superintendent until 1810).
  • Post not recorded

Resident Commissioner, Bombay

Naval Storekeeper, Bombay Dockyard

Included:[12]

  • 1794, James Moseley. [13]
  • 1796–1801, Philip Dundas.
  • 1801–1807, Simon Halliday.
  • 1807-1808, De Souza
  • 1808–1810, William Taylor Money.
  • 1810–1811, Hamilton.
  • 1811–1816, Charles Northcoate.

Master-Shipwright, Bombay Dockyard

Included:[14][15]

  • 1670, Warwick Pett.[16]
  • 1736–1774, Lovji Nusserwanjee Wadia.
  • 1774–1790, Maneckjee Lowjee Wadia
  • 1790-1792, Maneckjee Lowjee Wadia & Bomanjee Lowjee Wadia. (joint)
  • 1792–1804, Framjee Maneckjee Wadia
  • 1804–1821, Framjee Maneckjee Wadia & Jamsetjee Bomanjee Wadia (joint)
  • 1821–1832, Nowrojee Jamsetjee Wadia.
Assistant Master Shipwright, Bombay

Administration of the Dockyard (Board of Admiralty)

Master-Shipwright, Bombay Dockyard

Included:[18][19]

  • 1670, Warwick Pett.[20]
  • 1832–1844, Nowrojee Jamsetjee Wadia.
  • 1844–1857, Gursetjee Rustomjee Wadia.
  • 1857–1866, Jehangir Nowrojee Wadia.
  • 1866–1884, Jamsetjee Duhunjibhoy Wadia.
Assistant Master Shipwright, Bombay

Chief Inspector of Machinery, Bombay

  • 1841–1857, Ardaseer Cursetjee Wadia.[22]

Superintendent, Bombay Dockyard

  1. Commander C. A. Scott, 1 June, 1918 - January, 1921.[23][24]

Captain Superintendent, Bombay Dockyard

  1. Captain Edward H. Dauglish, 1932.[25]
  2. Captain Charles J. Nicoll, 1937.[26]
  3. Captain R.R. Caws, 1939 - 1 April, 1942.[27]
  4. Captain W. R. Shewring, 1 April, 1942 - April, 1945.[28]

References

  1. Day, John Frederick. (April 2012) ' British Admiralty Control and Naval Power in the Indian Ocean (1793-1815) (Volume 1 of 2)'. Submitted as a thesis for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Maritime History, University of Exeter. pp.56–61.
  2. Day, pp.56–61.
  3. Day, pp.56–61.
  4. Day. pp.58.
  5. Day. p.58.
  6. Arnold, David (2004), The New Cambridge History of India: Science, Technology and Medicine in Colonial India, pp. 101-102, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0521563194.
  7. Day. pp.58–59.
  8. Day. p. 59.
  9. Writer.), E. MILES (Nautical; Miles, Lawford (1841). An epitome, historical and statistical, descriptive of the Royal Naval Service of England. By E. M., with the assistance of ... L. Miles ... With ... illustrations, etc. Ackermann & Company. p. 88.
  10. Archives, The National. "Navy Board and Admiralty: Yard Pay Books". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. The National Archives, 1660 to 1857, ADM 42. Retrieved 16 March 2018.
  11. Day. p. 429.
  12. Day. p. 429.
  13. Ward, Peter A. (2013). British Naval Power in the East, 1794-1805: The Command of Admiral Peter Rainier. Woodbridge, United Kingdom.: Boydell Press. p. 181. ISBN 9781843838487.
  14. Harrison, Simon (2010–2018). "Master Shipwright at Bombay Dockyard". threedecks.org. S. Harrison. Retrieved 7 November 2019.
  15. Wadia, Ruttonjee Ardeshir (1955). Bombay Dockyard And The Wadia Master Builders. Bombay, India: R. A. Wadia. p. xiii.
  16. Low, Charles Rathbone (2012). History of the Indian Navy 1613-1863 Volume I. Luton, England.: Andrews UK Limited. p. 59. ISBN 9781781501672.
  17. Wadia, Ruttonjee Ardeshir (1955). Bombay Dockyard And The Wadia Master Builders. Bombay, India: R. A. Wadia. p. xiii.
  18. Harrison, Simon (2010–2018). "Master Shipwright at Bombay Dockyard". threedecks.org. S. Harrison. Retrieved 7 November 2019.
  19. Wadia, Ruttonjee Ardeshir (1955). Bombay Dockyard And The Wadia Master Builders. Bombay, India: R. A. Wadia. p. xiii.
  20. Low, Charles Rathbone (2012). History of the Indian Navy 1613-1863 Volume I. Luton, England.: Andrews UK Limited. p. 59. ISBN 9781781501672.
  21. Wadia, Ruttonjee Ardeshir (1955). Bombay Dockyard And The Wadia Master Builders. Bombay, India: R. A. Wadia. p. xiii.
  22. Wadia, Ruttonjee Ardeshir (1955). Bombay Dockyard And The Wadia Master Builders. Bombay, India: R. A. Wadia. p. xiii.
  23. Admiralty, British. (December 1920). The Navy List. Naval Establishments of Government of India. Royal Indian Marine. H.M.S.O. London. p.1908.
  24. Admiralty, British. (January 1921). The Navy List. Naval Establishments of Government of India. Royal Indian Marine. H.M.S.O. London. p.1908.
  25. Svonavec, Stephen (2001–2020). "Royal Indian Marine October 1932". www.fleetorganization.com. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
  26. Svonavec, Stephen (2001–2020). "Royal Indian Navy December 1937". www.fleetorganization.com. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
  27. Clancey, Patrick; Jewell, Larry. "HyperWar: The Royal Indian Navy (Chapter 10)". www.ibiblio.org. HyperWar Foundation. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
  28. Admiralty, British. (April 1945) The Navy List Quarterly Volume III. Flag Officers in Commission. H.M.S.O. London. p.2354.

Bibliography

  1. Admiralty, Great Britain (1823). The Navy List. London: H.M. Stationery Office.
  2. Arnold, David (2004), The New Cambridge History of India: Science, Technology and Medicine in Colonial India, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0521563194.
  3. Day, John Frederick. (April 2012) ' British Admiralty Control and Naval Power in the Indian Ocean (1793-1815) (Volume 1 of 2)'. Submitted as a thesis for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Maritime History, University of Exeter.
  4. Harrison, Simon (2010–2018). "Master Shipwright at Bombay Dockyard". threedecks.org. S. Harrison. Retrieved 3 September 2019.
  5. Low, Charles Rathbone (2012). History of the Indian Navy 1613-1863 Volume I. Luton, England.: Andrews UK Limited. ISBN 9781781501672.
  6. Wadia, Ruttonjee Ardeshir (1955). Bombay Dockyard And The Wadia Master Builders. Bombay, India: R. A. Wadia.
  7. Ward, Peter A. (2013). British Naval Power in the East, 1794-1805: The Command of Admiral Peter Rainier. Woodbridge, United Kingdom.: Boydell Press. ISBN 9781843838487.