Ajaccio Dockyard

From Naval History Archive
Jump to navigationJump to search
HM Dockyard, Ajaccio
White Ensign of Great Britain (1707–1800).svg
Part of Mediterranean Station
Ajaccio in Corsica
TypeNaval Base and Naval Dockyard
Site information
OwnerAdmiralty
OperatorRoyal Navy
Controlled byFlag of the Navy Board 1707 to 1800.gif Navy Board
Site history
In use1796-1799
Installation information
Past
commanders
Resident Commissioner Corsica
(1796-1799)
OccupantsMediterranean Squadron

Ajaccio Dockyard (Corsica) or formally His Majesty's Dockyard, Ajaccio was originally a Royal Naval Dockyard seized from the France during the French Revolutionary Wars in 1794,[1] when British forces occupied the island of Corsica. It was briefly a naval base and facility of the Mediterranean Station. The yard was managed by the Navy Board through its Resident Commissioner, Corsica until 1799 when the island of Corsica fell back into French hands.

The yard was used by both the Royal Navy's Mediterranean Squadron.

History

Ajaccio Dockyard (Corsica) was a Royal Naval Dockyard acquired from the France during the French Revolutionary Wars in 1794, when British forces occupied the island of Corsica. It was briefly a naval base and facility of the Mediterranean Station.[2] The yard was managed by the Navy Board through its Resident Commissioner, Corsica until 1799 when the island of Corsica fell back into French hands.

Administration of the Dockyard (Navy Board)

From 1546 until 1660 all Royal Naval Dockyards were administered by the Council of the Marine. From 1660 were administered by a resident commissioner who supervised the other senior officers of the yard on behalf of the Navy Board in London. By an Order in Council dated 27 June 1832 it transferred administrative control of the dockyards organisation to the Board of Admiralty, and the role of the Resident Commissioner of the Navy was abolished and replaced by either a Captain Superintendent or Commodore Superintendent or Admiral-Superintendent depending on the size of the naval dockyard.[3][4] In 1971 all remaining flag officer's titled as admiral superintendent were renamed Port Admirals.

Resident Commissioner of the Navy at Corsica

References

  1. Blake, Nicholas; Lawrence, Richard (2005). "Royal Navy Bases". The Illustrated Companion to Nelson's Navy. Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, United States.: Stackpole Books. p. 15. ISBN 978-0-8117-3275-8.
  2. Blake and Lawrence. p.15.
  3. Writer.), E. MILES (Nautical; Miles, Lawford (1841). An epitome, historical and statistical, descriptive of the Royal Naval Service of England. By E. M., with the assistance of ... L. Miles ... With ... illustrations, etc. Ackermann & Company. p. 88.
  4. Archives, The National. "Navy Board and Admiralty: Yard Pay Books". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. The National Archives, 1660 to 1857, ADM 42. Retrieved 16 March 2018.

Bibliography

  1. Blake, Nicholas; Lawrence, Richard (2005). "Royal Navy Bases". The Illustrated Companion to Nelson's Navy. Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, United States.: Stackpole Books. ISBN 978-0-8117-3275-8