Admiral Commanding, Iceland

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Admiral Commanding, Iceland
Ensign of the Royal Navy animated.gif
Ensign of the Royal Navy
Admiralty
Reports toFirst Sea Lord
NominatorFirst Sea Lord
AppointerFirst Lord of the Admiralty
Subject to formal approval by the Queen-in-Council
Formation1941–1943

The Admiral Commanding, Iceland was a senior appointment of the British Royal Navy during the Second World War. His headquarters were at Hvitanes, Hvalfjörður fjord, on the west coast of Iceland.

The post holder was responsible for commanding the Iceland (C) Station.

History

Following the German invasion of Denmark in April 1940, Iceland, then in personal union with Denmark, declared neutrality throughout the rest of the war. Iceland's location was of strategic importance to the British who decided to station naval forces at a naval base called HMS Baldur[1] at Hvitanes following the invasion of Iceland in May 1940.[2] In addition it also established an accounting and accommodation shore base called HMS Baldur II. Iceland was an important base for North Atlantic convoys, patrol and anti-submarine duties.

In September 1941 the Department of Admiralty appointed am admiral to administer the Iceland (C) station under the title Admiral Commanding, Iceland.[3] until August 1943. No flag officer was assigned to the Iceland command until October 1943 when the new incoming commanding officer was to be named as Flag Officer Commanding, Iceland (C).[4]

Office Holder

Footnotes

  1. "Private Papers of J Harvey". Imperial War Museums. London England: Imperial War Museums. 2003. Retrieved 15 October 2018.
  2. Duke, Simon (1989). United States Military Forces and Installations in Europe. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 181. ISBN 9780198291329.
  3. Admiralty, Great Britain (December 1942). "Flag Officers in Commission". Navy List. London England: HM Stationery Office. p. 1337.
  4. Admiralty, Great Britain (July 1945). "Navy List". digital.nls.uk. National Library of Scotland. p. 2349. Retrieved 26 October 2018.