1st Aircraft Carrier Squadron

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1st Aircraft Carrier Squadron
Ensign of the Royal Navy animated.gif
Active1943
Disbanded1948
CountryFlag United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.gif United Kingdom
AllegianceBritish Empire
BranchNaval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
TypeSquadron
Commanders
FirstRear-Admiral Clement Moody
LastRear-Admiral Sir Philip Louis Vian

The 1st Aircraft Carrier Squadronwas a formation of aircraft carriers of the Royal Navy first formed on 1 December 1943 as part of the Eastern Fleet. On 22 November 1944 it was reassigned to the British Pacific Fleet. It was disbanded in 1947.

History

The squadron was formed on 1 December 1943 under the command of Rear-Admiral, Clement Moody who was appointed Rear-Admiral, Eastern Fleet Aircraft Carriers and the joint title Rear-Admiral, 1st Aircraft Carrier Squadron.[1] On 15 November 1944 Rear-Admiral Philip Louis Vian was sent out to the Far East by the British Admiralty. On 22 November 1944 the Eastern Fleet was disbanded and this squadron was re assigned to the British Pacific Fleet

Rear-Admiral Vian was then appointed Flag Officer Commanding, Aircraft Carriers, British Pacific Fleet and jointly Flag Officer Commanding, 1st Aircraft Carrier Squadron, British Pacific Fleet until May 1946. While serving in the Pacific within the United States Fifth Fleet, the squadron was designated "Task Group 57.2". During Operation Iceberg off Okinawa, Japan the squadron received heavy Kamikaze attacks. Their armoured flight decks were adequate protection for the hangar decks, but the stress caused deformation of the ships' structures. In May 1946 Rear-Admiral Charles Henry Lawrence Woodhouse succeeded admiral Vian and was appointed Rear-Admiral Aircraft Carriers British Pacific Fleet and Rear-Admiral, 1st Aircraft Carrier Squadron, his flag ship was the Colossus-class aircraft carrier HMS Glory.[2]

On 15 September, 1946 a new naval command area the Far East Station was established to be headquartered in Hong Kong and the British Pacific Fleet was assigned as the main naval force on that station. [3] HMS Theseus served as squadron flagship for the squadron in 1947.[4] Early in 1948 the squadron consisting of the carriers HMS Triumph and HMS Unicorn, with the cruiser HMS Belfast as flagship, was en route to Hong Kong from Japan when the Korean War broke out and was sent back to Japan.[5]

On 15 September 1948 the Far East Station headquarters were moved to Singapore at that point the British Pacific Fleet ceased to exist and the Commander-in-Chief, British Pacific Fleet became Commander-in-Chief, Far East Station.[6]

In Command

Rear-Admiral, 1st Aircraft Carrier Squadron (1943-44)

Rear-Admiral, 1st Aircraft Carrier Squadron
Rank Flag Name Term Ref
1 Rear-Admiral Rear Admiral command Flag RN from 1864.png Clement Moody November 1943 – 22 November 1944 [7]

Flag Officer Commanding, 1st Aircraft Carrier Squadron (1944-46)

Flag Officer Commanding, 1st Aircraft Carrier Squadron
Rank Flag Name Term Notes
1 Rear-Admiral Rear Admiral command Flag RN from 1864.png Sir Philip Louis Vian 22 November – May 1946

Rear-Admiral, 1st Aircraft Carrier Squadron (1946-48)

Rear-Admiral, 1st Aircraft Carrier Squadron
Rank Flag Name Term Ref
1 Rear-Admiral Rear Admiral command Flag RN from 1864.png Charles Henry Lawrence Woodhouse May 1946 – April 1948 [8][9]

References

  1. Hobbs, David (2012). The British Pacific Fleet: The Royal Navy's Most Powerful Strike Force. Barnsley, England: Seaforth Publishing. p. 33. ISBN 978-1-84832-048-2.
  2. British Admiralty (July 1946) The Navy List. Flag Officers in Commission. H.M.S.O. London. England. p. 1871.
  3. Hobbs, David (2012). "15: A Peacetime Fleet". The British Pacific Fleet: The Royal Navy's Most Powerful Strike Force. Barnsley, England.: Seaforth Publishing. pp. 347–377. ISBN 978-1-84832-048-2.
  4. Naval-history.net, HMS Theseus, accessed October 2011
  5. ""The Forgotten Cruise" HMS Triumph and the 13th Carrier Air Group in Korea". royalnavyresearcharchive.org.uk. Retrieved 1 November 2021.
  6. Hobbs, David (2012). "15: A Peacetime Fleet". The British Pacific Fleet: The Royal Navy's Most Powerful Strike Force. Barnsley, England.: Seaforth Publishing. pp. 347–377. ISBN 978-1-84832-048-2.
  7. Hobbs, David (2012). The British Pacific Fleet: The Royal Navy's Most Powerful Strike Force. Barnsley, England: Seaforth Publishing. p. 33. ISBN 978-1-84832-048-2.
  8. Houterman, Hans; Koppes, Jeroen. "World War II unit histories & officers: Wo". www.unithistories.com. Netherlands: Houterman and Koppes. Retrieved 1 November 2021.
  9. British Admiralty (July 1946) The Navy List. Flag Officers in Commission. H.M.S.O. London. England. p. 1871.